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Bellevue Hospital staff have been 'refused service at restaurants' by New Yorkers afraid of contracting Ebola, Mayor Bill De Blasio reveals {F}

Jamaica, Trinidad, Antigua, Suriname join other Caribbean countries banning nationals from Ebola hit countries'Unacceptable': New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio held a press conference on Sunday to address reports that Bellevue health care workers were being mistreated for working at the hospital where the city's first Ebola patient is being cared for 

  • New York Mayor Bill De Blasio says there will be consequences for individuals found disrespecting these health care workers 
  • Dr Craig Spencer is currently being treated for Ebola in an isolation unit at Bellevue
  • The mayor also called the quarantine of Doctors without Borders nurse Kaci Hickox in New Jersey 'inappropriate' 
  • The nurse spoke out to CNN this weekend to describe the conditions of her 21-day isolation as 'inhumane' with no flushable toilet, TV or reading material

New Yorkers are not particularly known for their hospitality, but Mayor Bill De Blasio thinks some have crossed a line in their treatment of the brave Bellevue Hospital staffers who have been caring for the city's first Ebola patient.

The mayor held an afternoon press conference on Sunday to discuss the mistreatment of Bellevue health care workers who he says have been denied service at restaurants, and had their children treated differently, just because they work at the same hospital where Dr Craig Spencer is currently being treated for the deadly disease in an isolation ward.

Dr Spencer, 33, was admitted to the hospital on Thursday - just six days after returning from Guinea where he was working with Doctors without Borders to aid in the largest outbreak of the virus in history. 


'Unacceptable': New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio held a press conference on Sunday to address reports that Bellevue health care workers were being mistreated for working at the hospital where the city's first Ebola patient is being cared for 

'Unacceptable': New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio held a press conference on Sunday to address reports that Bellevue health care workers were being mistreated for working at the hospital where the city's first Ebola patient is being cared for 

PICTURE EXCLUSIVE: Moment Ebola victim arrived in Dallas and greeted smiling relative after flight from Liberia - bringing deadly virus to American soil

Now in New York: Bellevue Hospital received its first Ebola patient on Thursday, after Dr Craig Spencer reported to the health care center just six days after returning from Ebola-stricken Guinea.

Now in New York: Bellevue Hospital received its first Ebola patient on Thursday, after Dr Craig Spencer reported to the health care center just six days after returning from Ebola-stricken Guinea.

PICTURED: U.S. doctor infected with Ebola virus unsteady on his feet as he is helped out of ambulance into hospital {VIDEO}

 
Brave volunteer: Dr Spencer returned to New York from Guinea on October 17, and admitted himself to the hospital six days later after noticing symptoms of the deadly virus 

Brave volunteer: Dr Spencer returned to New York from Guinea on October 17, and admitted himself to the hospital six days later after noticing symptoms of the deadly virus 

Mayor De Blasio and his wife Chiraline McCray visited the isolation ward at Bellevue where Dr Spencer is being treated and said the volunteering health care workers they encountered there were 'calm, cool, collected and purposeful'.

However, he was shocked to hear reports about how some of these doctors and nurses were being denied food and treated differently when strangers learned they worked at the hospital.

Mayor De Blasio called these instances 'absolutely unacceptable', adding that 'there will be consequences for those individuals' found disrespecting nurses or other medical personnel. 

He did not specify what kind of punishment could be handed out. 

Mr De Blasio went on to describe the Bellevue workers treating Dr Craig Spencer as the 'the first responders in this crisis' and like 'the Marines of our health care system'. 

The mayor also addressed a nurse who was being monitored this weekend in New Jersey, under new rules in both New Jersey and New York requiring health care workers returning from West Africa to submit to a 21-day quarantine.

Nurse Kaci Hickox talked to CNN about her 'inhumane' containment at the airport, saying she is confined in a tent with limited contact to the outside world, no flushable toilet, TV or reading material. 

Mayor de Blasio appeared to hit out at New Jersey officials, by calling the conditions of Ms Hickox's quarantine 'inappropriate'.

'The problem here is that this hero coming back from the front, having done the right thing, was treated with disrespect and was treated as if she had done something wrong when she hadn't,' Mayor de Blasio said. 'We owe her better than that.'  

However, the mayor added that he respects the right of other governments to make their own decisions in how to handle this outbreak.  

'Inhumane': Mayor De Blasio also spoke about Nurse Kaci Hickox, who is currently under quarantine in New Jersey. The nurse spoke to CNN, calling her quarantine 'inhumane' for having no access to a flushable toilet, TV or reading material. Mr De Blasio said her treatment was 'inappropriate' 

'Inhumane': Mayor De Blasio also spoke about Nurse Kaci Hickox, who is currently under quarantine in New Jersey. The nurse spoke to CNN, calling her quarantine 'inhumane' for having no access to a flushable toilet, TV or reading material. Mr De Blasio said her treatment was 'inappropriate' 

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President Obama Names Ebola 'Czar' As Public Fears Mount {VIDEO} St Kitts Nevis joins other Caribbean countries banning visitors

geographical map of Africa with magnifier and ebola virusThe Governments of Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, on Thursday issued an immediate travel bans against certain persons traveling directly or indirectly from some countries in West Africa.

In Jamaica – the Ministry of National Security said the ban extends to Guinea, Libera and Sierra Leone.

The ban also extends to Commonwealth citizens who have travelled to or transited through Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone within 28 days of their arrival to Jamaica.

CARICOM nationals benefiting from the free movement regime are also subject to this landing restriction which is a temporary measure necessary for the protection of human and animal health.

It was also announced that Jamaican citizens and residents, who have travelled to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone within 28 days of their arrival , will be quarantined in the interest of public health and national security upon their arrival in Jamaica.

This applies equally to any person having a right of entry pursuant to Jamaica’s obligations under international organization head quarters agreements.

The Security Ministry noted that the Government of Jamaica reserves the right to screen all Jamaican nationals.

And Trinidad and Tobago’s Health Minister Dr Fuad Khan announced during a post Cabinet news conference at the Office of the Prime Minister that anyone coming from Sierra Leone, Guinea, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, and Nigeria, will be denied entry.

In addition, people who visited the named African countries within the past six weeks, will also not be allowed entry.

Citizens who visited these countries will be quarantined for 21 days upon arrival in Trinidad and Tobago.

<strongEbola-740Antigua and Barbuda and Suriname have become the latest Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries to issue a ban on travelers from Ebola-affected countries in West Africa.

Director of Communications, Maurice Merchant told the Caribbean Media Corporation (CMC) that the Gaston Browne-led cabinet agreed to travel restrictions on passengers traveling from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. The often deadly disease has been prevalent in West African nations.

As part of the restriction, St John’s will discontinue issuing to the three African states hardest hit by the Ebola virus. Passengers who are known to have visited those countries within the last three weeks will not be allowed entry to the country

Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago and St Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Guyana have effected similar restrictions as the disease, for which there is no cure, spreads to other parts of the world including the United States and Spain.

Suriname has also announced that it too had placed a ban on visitors from West Africa.

“It concerns people who have spent 21 days or more in Ebola areas and who want to travel to Suriname. They will not be allowed in,” a spokesman for the Ministry of Health Martelise Eersel said.

She said it does not matter whether the people hail from West Africa or had visited a country there, they will not be allowed onto any aircraft heading towards Suriname.

“If you’re in the European Union (EU), that is where you will stay,” she said.

Suriname in August said it would no longer host the Summit of the African, Pacific and Caribbean (ACP) that was due to have taken place there in September.

The summit would have brought delegates from member countries from Sub-Saharan Africa to Paramaribo.

Symptoms of the virus tend to show two to 21 days after infection. They include, high fever, headache, joint and muscle and stomach pain. An estimated 4,500 people have died from the disease and the World Health Organization (WHO) projects as many as 20,000 cases by November if efforts to curtail the disease are not stepped up.

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President Barack Obama turned to a trusted adviser to lead the nation's Ebola response on Friday as efforts to clamp down on any possible route of infection from three Texas cases expanded, reaching a cruise ship at sea and multiple airline flights.

Facing renewed criticism of his handling of the Ebola risk, Obama will make Ron Klain, a former chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden, his point man on the U.S. fight against Ebola at home and in West Africa. Klain will report to national security adviser Susan Rice and to homeland security adviser Lisa Monaco, the White House said.

Ron Klain

Meanwhile, the World Health Organization admitted to mistakes of its own in failing to contain the outbreak still spreading out of control in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

"Nearly everyone involved in the outbreak response failed to see some fairly plain writing on the wall," the U.N. health agency said in a draft internal document obtained by The Associated Press. The response was marred by incompetency and ineffective bureaucracy, the document says, and experts should have realized that traditional containment methods wouldn't work in an African region with porous borders and broken health systems.

Under pressure from Republican lawmakers, Obama on Thursday said that he was not "philosophically opposed" to considering restricting travel to the U.S. from the three Ebola-stricken West African nations. But he said health and security experts continue to tell him that the screening measures already in place for travelers are more effective.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest on Friday reaffirmed the White House's current opposition to such restrictions.

"At this point, if our core priority is protecting the American public, then we're not going to put in place a travel ban," he said.

Government officials said early Friday that they had been seeking to remove from a Caribbean cruise ship a Dallas health care worker who handled an Ebola lab specimen, although she has shown no signs of infection for 19 days. But the ship did not get clearance to dock in Cozumel, Mexico, on Friday, a day after officials in Belize would not allow the woman or her spouse to leave, a Carnival Cruise Lines spokeswoman said.

The cruise line said the ship was now on the way to its home port of Galveston, Texas, for its originally scheduled return of Sunday morning. The cruise company said that the woman, a lab supervisor traveling with her spouse, remained in isolation "and is not deemed to be a risk to any guests or crew."

Still, under new tighter travel rules placed on the staff of a Dallas hospital where two nurses caught Ebola from a Liberian patient, the woman would not have been permitted to be on the ship.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Ebola isn't contagious until symptoms appear. Ebola isn't spread through the air like the flu; people catch it by direct contact with a sick person's bodily fluids, such as blood or vomit.

Doctors at the National Institutes of Health in Maryland said that a Dallas nurse, Nina Pham, brought there for Ebola treatment was very tired but resting comfortably Friday in "fair" condition.

Nina Pham

The second nurse to contract Ebola, Amber Vinson, was being treated at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, as precautions related to her personal travel spiraled wider.

Amber Vinson

Passengers and crew aboard seven Frontier Airlines flights were affected, too, as well as a handful of people in the Akron, Ohio, area. An Akron bridal shop that Vinson visited was closed and shoppers were being contacted.

A CDC official said Vinson may already have had Ebola when she flew from Dallas to Ohio to visit relatives. The agency had earlier said Vinson didn't become sick until the morning after she returned to Dallas.

Officials are investigating whether she had symptoms as far back as Saturday, Oct. 11, or possibly earlier, said Dr. Chris Braden of the CDC.

"Some more information that's come through just recently would say that we can't rule out the fact that she might have had the start of her illness on Friday," Braden said.

Police said Vinson stayed at the home of her mother and stepfather in Tallmadge, northeast of Akron, and the home has been cordoned off with yellow tape. Eight individuals in northeast Ohio were under quarantine, health officials said.

Frontier Airlines said it would contact passengers on seven flights, including two that carried Vinson and others afterward that used the same plane.

Airline officials put two pilots and four flight attendants on paid leave for 21 days and said they did not know when the aircraft, which has been cleaned several times, would return to service.

In Dallas, officials took a tougher approach toward monitoring dozens of health care workers who were exposed to the virus while treating Liberian traveler Thomas Eric Duncan, who died at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

The health care workers were asked to sign legally binding documents agreeing not to go to public places or use public transportation. The penalties for anyone who breaks the agreement weren't disclosed.

The chief clinical officer at the hospital, Dr. Daniel Varga, said the hospital was caught short when Duncan came to the institution "with non-specific symptoms."

"I think we all in the health care community underestimated the challenge of diagnosis," he said on ABC's "Good Morning America" Friday.

He also said the two nurses who contracted the disease had followed standard hospital procedure. "We have no indication that Nina or Amber had any break in protocol. We were working with the best information we had," Varga said.

Canceling a campaign fundraising trip for the second straight day Thursday, Obama met into the evening with top aides and health officials. The White House said Obama also placed calls to Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven to discuss a need for an international response to the outbreak in West Africa.

___

Associated Press writers Emily Schmall and Nomaan Merchant in Dallas; Erica Werner, Josh Lederman and Matthew Daly in Washington; and Ann Sanner in Columbus, Ohio, contributed to this report.

Obama Appoints Ebola 'czar' As Anxiety Mounts

WH Picks Ebola Czar to Lead Virus Task Force

The President Meets on the U.S. Response to Ebola

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Ban on West African nationals coming to Caribbean Islands. Do you agree?sierra-leone-airport-screening

BUILDING NEW PORT HEALTH SCREENING ROOM AT FREETOWN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IN SIERRA LEONE. 

St. Kitts Nevis has joined the list of countries in the region to place a ban on nationals from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea as a precaution against the deadly Ebola virus.

The Office of the Prime Minister in a statement late Wednesday said the prohibition will also be applied to travelers who have visited the three countries in the preceding 21 days.

“The Ministry of Health will closely monitor the situation in West Africa and other countries and will continue to work closely with regional and international partners to prepare for any potential threat,”” t he statement read.

The Cabinet, has also requested the activation of the National Disaster Mitigation Council to coordinate preparedness and response with the health officials and to provide Cabinet updates.

The same restrictions have been implemented in St. Lucia and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Grenada is contemplating a similar ban.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that nearly 4500 people have died from the Ebola virus during the current outbreak, the majority of those in West Africa.

There have been two diagnosed cases of Ebola that were contracted in the United States and one in Spain; all three patients are health care workers.


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Ebola screening underway at US and UK airports as another case diagnosed in US

St. Vincent and the Grenadines has placed a ban on nationals from Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, entering the island, as Caribbean countries continue to put in place measures to deal with a possible outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in the region

Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves said that the measure was taken given the lack of infrastructure on the island to deal with the Ebola virus for which there is no known cure.

DO YOU AGREE WITH HIM?

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University cleaners told to watch for blood and vomit in students’ bedrooms as 20,000 return to Britain from Ebola-hit countries for start of termTablet with the text Ebola on the display

Ebola screening got underway on Saturday for some travellers at New York’s John F Kennedy International Airport, with four other US airports due to come on stream on Thursday.

The testing will expand to Washington-Dulles, Newark, Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport and Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta.

The five airports, including JFK, receive 94 percent of air travellers arriving from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the countries worst affected by the deadly virus.

An official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) nevertheless warned against complacency.

“No matter how many of these procedures are put into place, we can’t get the risk to zero,” Dr Martin Cetron, director of the CDC’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, told reporters on Saturday.

“That will not be the case but this additional layer should add a measure of security to the American public. This entry screening procedure, for example, would not necessarily have caught the patient in Dallas.”

Dr Cetron was referring to the first case of Ebola diagnosed in the US: that of Thomas Duncan, an infected Liberian national, who died last week at a Texas hospital after arriving in the United States prior to showing any symptoms.

A nurse who treated Duncan has since contracted the disease in Dallas, while 48 of her colleagues are undergoing daily testing for the virus and senior health officials are anticipating further cases.

Under the latest screening measures, Coast Guard corpsmen and eventually medical workers under contract will take passengers’ temperature and Customs and Border Protection staffers will question them about their health and possible exposure to Ebola.

Those suspected of possible Ebola exposure will be referred to CDC personnel for further screening.

“The expanded screening measures provide this layer of protection to the already established protocols to minimize the risk of another case of Ebola here in the United States,” said R. Gil Kerlikowske, commissioner of US Customs and Border Protection.

Kerlikowske said travellers with fever or other symptoms or who may have been exposed to Ebola will be referred to the CDC to determine whether they should be taken to a hospital. In addition, Border Patrol agents will monitor travellers for signs of illness.

According to Cetron, all travellers are already being screened with questionnaires about possible exposure and symptoms and having their temperatures checked before departing the affected countries.

Meanwhile, in London, the UK Department of Health said enhanced screening will be implemented at London’s Heathrow and Gatwick airports and Eurostar rail terminals.

According to the department, the screenings will involve assessing passengers’ recent travel history, who they have been in contact with and onward travel arrangements.

Some critics nevertheless say the screenings won’t have much effect from a public health perspective.

Laurie Garrett, a senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of “The Coming Plague,” stressed that the screenings would not have detected Duncan’s case.

“So I see this more as something to calm the nerves of the American people, the British people, the French people,” she said.

Health officials, moreover, have warned the screenings will likely catch some people with fevers, but not Ebola, and could miss some with Ebola as symptoms can take up to 21 days to appear.

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2nd U.S. Ebola Case: Health Care Worker Who Came In Contact With Patient Who Died At Dallas Hospital Tests Positive {VIDEO}

  • Special attention is being paid to students sharing bathrooms and kitchens
  • Comes after the government announced plans to screen air passengers
  • Yesterday emergency services staged nationwide Ebola outbreak simulation 

University cleaners have been warned to look out for blood and vomit as an estimated 20,000 students return from West Africa for the start of term.

Universities the length and breadth of the country have drawn up emergency measures to monitor the highest-risk students for up to three weeks - the incubation period of the Ebola virus.

Special attention is being paid to those who may be sharing bathrooms and kitchens, but officials stressed they were sensitive to any backlash against West African students.

Scroll down for video 

Fears: The Postgraduate Statistics Centre at Lancaster University, where cleaners have been warned to watch out for body fluids when cleaning the bathrooms in halls of residence housing West African students

Fears: The Postgraduate Statistics Centre at Lancaster University, where cleaners have been warned to watch out for body fluids when cleaning the bathrooms in halls of residence housing West African students

About 20,000 students from West African countries affected by Ebola are studying at British universities, the Sunday Times reports.

Around 17,000 of these are from Nigeria, however, where the outbreak is said to have been contained.

'Most universities are making sure cleaners are briefed on the risks,' Fay Sherrington, a student services manager at Lancaster University told the Sunday Times.

'They have more chance of coming into contact with bodily fluids because they are cleaning bathrooms in residences.'

The move follows growing fears that an infected person could bring Ebola virus into the UK and cause an outbreak, as has already happened in the U.S.

The government this week announced plans to screen air and Eurostar passengers arriving in Britain, but with no symptoms visible during Ebola's incubation period, there are questions as to how effective such screening may be.

Exeter University revealed it had around 200 students returning from Ebola affected areas. A group of university officers would be monitoring accommodation arrangements, particularly where there was shared use of kitchen and bathrooms, but a spokesman insisted officials were sensitive to the possibility of alienating West African students. 

At University College, London, advice has been circulated telling students to call emergency services if they develop headache, diarrhoea or vomiting within three weeks of arriving back in Britain. And at Cardiff University staff are being told to isolate students complaining of Ebola-like symptoms.

MailOnline contacted the National Union of Students for comment on the arrangements, but none was forthcoming.

Melting pot: At University College London, advice has been circulated telling students to call emergency services if they develop headache, diarrhoea or vomiting within three weeks of arriving back in Britain

Melting pot: At University College London, advice has been circulated telling students to call emergency services if they develop headache, diarrhoea or vomiting within three weeks of arriving back in Britain

Last night the Health Secretary insisted Britain has 'robust' plans in place to cope with an Ebola outbreak, after a national emergency services exercise.

Jeremy Hunt insisted he was 'doubly reassured' that the Government and emergency services were ready if the disease reached the UK after an exercise to test how the authorities would respond.

The eight-hour mock-up saw actors simulate symptoms of the deadly virus while Government ministers joined dozens of medical professionals from hospitals, the ambulance service and Public Health England as they played through scenarios across the country.

In one case a person who collapsed in Gateshead shopping centre was placed in isolation at the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle after being assessed.

Samples were sent for urgent testing at the Porton Down government science laboratories and returned an Ebola diagnosis.

In a separate case, a patient turned up to the Hillingdon walk-in centre in London with flu-like symptoms after having recently returned from West Africa.

Blood tests were again sent to Porton Down, Wiltshire, and the patient was diagnosed with the disease. Public Health England also began tracing the contacts of the people involved.

UK conducts Ebola response exercise to test the emergency...
'Doubly reassured': Staff from North East Ambulance Service and the Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle, take part in the nationwide simulation of an Ebola virus outbreak in Britain yesterday

'Doubly reassured': Staff from North East Ambulance Service and the Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle, take part in the nationwide simulation of an Ebola virus outbreak in Britain yesterday

CDC investigating Ebola protocol as second US patient confirmed

Mr Hunt chaired a simulated meeting of the emergency Cobra committee as part of the exercise.

He said: 'This is an extremely useful exercise and I feel doubly reassured that we have robust plans in place in the event that we get an Ebola case in the UK.

'We will evaluate what went well and what we need to improve.

'This exercise is just one small part of our ongoing contingency plans for Ebola. It builds on activity we routinely practise for a wide variety of illnesses and other emergencies.'

The number of deaths confirmed as a result of the current Ebola outbreak stands at 4,033, according to the World Health Organisation. Most were in Liberioa, Sierra Leone and Guinea. 


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{VIDEO} Medical team in full body suits board US plane in Dominican Republic after passenger sneezed and yelled 'I have Ebola!' as a joke

A Texas health worker who provided care for the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has tested positive for the deadly virus in a preliminary examination, a state health official said on Sunday.

The health care worker at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital reported a low-grade fever Friday night and was isolated and referred for testing, the Texas Department of State Health Services said in a statement.

eboli virus ghana

"We knew a second case could be a reality, and we've been preparing for this possibility," said Dr. David Lakey, commissioner of the health service.

The first person in the United States diagnosed with Ebola, Liberia citizen Thomas Eric Duncan, died in an isolation ward of the Dallas hospital on Oct. 8, 11 days after being admitted.

Thomas Eric Duncan

The U.S. government has since ordered five airports to start screening passengers from West Africa for fever.

The number of people known to have died in the worst Ebola outbreak on record has risen to 4,033 out of 8,399 cases in seven countries, the World Health Organization said on Friday.

Liberia has been the worst affected country with 2,316 victims, followed by 930 in Sierra Leone, 778 in Guinea, eight in Nigeria and one in the United States, WHO said.

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Hotel quarantined as EBOLA 'claims first British victim'

ebola

  • Man sneezed, yelled 'I have Ebola!' on US flight to Dominican Republic
  • Four Hazmat officers rushed onto US Airways plane from Philadelphia
  • He was detained and taken for testing, exclaiming: 'I ain't been to Africa'
  • 255 passengers forced to stay on board for two hours until he was cleared
  • Punta Cana Airport bosses said he is 'unbalanced' and 'did it for attention'

A Hazmat team rushed on to a plane from Philadelphia in the Dominican Republic after a man sneezed and yelled: 'I have Ebola!'

The American passenger, who does not have Ebola, was detained by four officers and taken to the airport's medical center in Punta Cana as he declared: 'I ain't from Africa'.

The remaining 255 people were forced to stay on board for two hours until he was cleared, despite airline staff insisting they believed it was a poor-taste joke.

SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO 


Warning: A flight attendant warned passengers an 'idiot' had provoked them to call a Hazmat team on board

Warning: A flight attendant warned passengers an 'idiot' had provoked them to call a Hazmat team on board

Fears: Passengers on the US Airways flight from Philadelphia covered their faces as the officers investigated

Fears: Passengers on the US Airways flight from Philadelphia covered their faces as the officers investigated

Detained: This is the man that sneezed and yelled 'I have Ebola!' as the four-hour flight neared Punta Cana

Detained: This is the man that sneezed and yelled 'I have Ebola!' as the four-hour flight neared Punta Cana

The incident on Wednesday came as the White House agreed to step up medical screening at hospitals across the nation after the first man diagnosed of Ebola in the US died.

Clad in blue protective overalls, four officers boarded the plane as passengers sat near the man

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'Why did my uncle die of Ebola while every other patient treated in America has survived?' Now relatives say Dallas virus victim Eric Thomas Duncan received 'unfair' treatmentEbola

  • The unnamed man is the first UK victim of Ebola, if disease is confirmed
  • The epidemic has killed 3,800 and infected at least 8,000 so far 
  • Macedonian authorities confirmed the dead man's nationality this evening
  • Health officials have also quarantined his friend, who has symptoms
  • The friend said the two travelled to Skopje directly from Britain
  • This raises the terrifying prospect that they contracted it in the UK 
  • Paramedics and staff at Skopje hotel where men stayed also in quarantine 

A British man has died of suspected Ebola in the Macedonian capital of Skopje.

If confirmed, the unnamed 58-year-old is the first British victim of the Ebola outbreak that has killed thousands in West Africa and has spread to North America and Europe.

A second man, a friend of the deceased, has also shown symptoms of the disease. The man's death and nationality was confirmed by the Macedonian Foreign Ministry this evening.

The spokesman said the friend told the authorities there they had travelled to Skopje directly from Britain and had not been in any country known to have Ebola outbreaks - raising the terrifying possibility that he contracted the disease in the UK or Macedonia. 

The UK Foreign Office says it is investigating the incident. So far the epidemic, the worst on record since Ebola was discovered in 1976, has claimed 3,800 lives and infected at least 8,000 people.


Macedonian police guard the entrance of a quarantined hotel in Skopje. A British man staying there has died of Ebola and his travelling companion has showed symptoms of the disease

Macedonian police guard the entrance of a quarantined hotel in Skopje. A British man staying there has died of Ebola and his travelling companion has showed symptoms of the disease

People look from the window of the quarantined hotel in Skopje where the unnamed British man was staying

People look from the window of the quarantined hotel in Skopje where the unnamed British man was staying

Health workers in Skopje, Macedonia, outside the hospital where the British man died of what is believed to be Ebola

Health workers in Skopje, Macedonia, outside the hospital where the British man died of what is believed to be Ebola

Macedonian TV station Alfa TV reported the patient was admitted to an infection clinic in the city with symptoms of the disease.

When admitted to the hospital, the patient was unable to communicate and passed away shortly after. Tests are underway to find out if he had the disease.

A spokesman from the Macedonian foreign ministry said: 'I can confirm that a British person has died and he is in the state hospital in Skopje.

'We are looking to see what are the reasons according to the protocols of the World Health Organization.

'There was a friend with him and he has also been retained in the hospital and the crew from the ambulance are also retained in the hospital.'  

The incubation period for Ebola can be between two and 21 days.

A Health Ministry official said the man had arrived in  Skopje, from Britain a week ago and had been rushed to hospital at 3pm on Thursday, where he died several hours later.

Journalists gather outside the hotel where a 58-year-old man was staying. The man's friend, who has symptoms of the disease, told authorities there they had travelled to Skopje directly from Britain and had not been in any country known to have Ebola outbreaks

Journalists gather outside the hotel where a 58-year-old man was staying. The man's friend, who has symptoms of the disease, told authorities there they had travelled to Skopje directly from Britain and had not been in any country known to have Ebola outbreaks

A Public Health Center vehicle is parked in front of the hotel. Staff and guests are unable to leave while tests are conducted

A Public Health Center vehicle is parked in front of the hotel. Staff and guests are unable to leave while tests are conducted

Jovanka Kostovska, left, of the Macedonian Health Ministry, speaks to the media during a news conference after a 58-year-old Briton died of severe internal bleeding shortly after being taken to a hospital from his hotel

Jovanka Kostovska, left, of the Macedonian Health Ministry, speaks to the media during a news conference after a 58-year-old Briton died of severe internal bleeding shortly after being taken to a hospital from his hotel

The unnamed man will be the first British victim of the Ebola outbreak that has killed thousands in West Africa and has spread to North America and Europe, if reports are confirmed

The unnamed man will be the first British victim of the Ebola outbreak that has killed thousands in West Africa and has spread to North America and Europe, if reports are confirmed

Dr. Jovanka Kostovska of the ministry's commission for infectious diseases said the man had been suffering from fever, vomiting and internal bleeding, and that his condition deteriorated rapidly.

'These are all symptoms of Ebola, which raises suspicions with this patient,' Kostovska told a news conference, adding that samples had been sent to Germany for tests to confirm the cause of death.

Staff of the hotel where the two Britons stayed have also been quarantined, as have the ambulance team and medical staff that treated the deceased. 

A building belonging to French health authorities was cordoned off on the outskirts of Paris on Thursday after a suspected case of Ebola was reported.

Around 60 people were quarantined at Pontoise - but it turned out to be a false alarm.

Local official Jean-Luc Nevache, announced that 'no one has been infected'. The alarm was raised late on Thursday afternoon in an administrative building of the General Council in the northwest suburb after four undocumented Guineans had complained of severe headache.

Ebola victim Teresa Romero Ramos' condition has deteriorated, hospital officials said today

Ebola victim Teresa Romero Ramos' condition has deteriorated, hospital officials said today

Doctors wear protective suits inside Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, where nurse Teresa Romero is being treated for the Ebola virus today

Doctors wear protective suits inside Carlos III hospital in Madrid, Spain, where nurse Teresa Romero is being treated for the Ebola virus today

Today the health of a Spanish nurse with Ebola worsened and four other people were put into isolation in Madrid.

Teresa Romero, 44, is the first person to have contracted Ebola outside of Africa, after becoming infected by a Spanish priest repatriated from Africa with the disease.

In total seven people are in isolation, though only Romero has tested positive for Ebola. The others include the nurse's husband and two doctors who cared for her. Three other people were released from the isolation unit late on Wednesday after testing negative. 

British nurse Will Pooley survived after becoming infected with the virus while working to help victims in Sierra Leone.

Grim task: Volunteers in protective suit carry for burial the body of a person who died from Ebola in Waterloo,Sierra Leone. The disease has claimed 3,800 lives and infected at least 8,000 people so far

Grim task: Volunteers in protective suit carry for burial the body of a person who died from Ebola in Waterloo,Sierra Leone. The disease has claimed 3,800 lives and infected at least 8,000 people so far

British Ebola survivor William Pooley, 29, a nurse who contracted the disease in Sierra Leone

British Ebola survivor William Pooley, 29, a nurse who contracted the disease in Sierra Leone

UK's William Pooley discusses his experience of Ebola (related)

Earlier this month the 29-year-old told an international summit the world must avoid 'at all cost' the 'horror and misery' of watching young children die from the disease in horrific, squalid conditions.

Mr Pooley, from Suffolk, returned from a life-saving mission to the U.S. where he gave blood to try and help a victim of the virus, a friend he worked with in Sierra Leone helping victims.

The British government tonight ordered airports to quiz passengers arriving from West Africa in an attempt to prevent Ebola entering the UK, just hours after ministers said it would do little to curb the spread of the deadly virus.

The British government tonight ordered airports to quiz passengers arriving from West Africa in an attempt to prevent Ebola entering the UK

The British government tonight ordered airports to quiz passengers arriving from West Africa in an attempt to prevent Ebola entering the UK

But experts today told MailOnline 'shutting borders will not stop Ebola', as leading experts say the key to tackling the vicious virus is 'rooting it out' at the source, in West Africa. 

Dr Ben Neuman, a virologist at the University of Reading, told MailOnline: 'Shutting borders will not stop Ebola, you have to root it out.'

He added: 'The longer this goes on the more likely it is we may see a case in the UK.

'But the UK deals with things like this effectively, they (the authorities) handle it.

'They are ready enough and have the capacity. There are a lot of doctors and nurses here who have been out there (to West Africa) with Doctors Without Borders, and so who have Ebola experience, which is invaluable.'

Meanwhile Professor Robert Dingwall, a specialist in health policy responses to infectious diseases at Nottingham Trent University accused the US of 'gesture politics', by introducing temperature screening at five airports.

He told MailOnline: 'Controls are costly to enforce, inconvenience people and disrupt economic activity while having little or no impact on the spread of infections.'

'We have to work now so that it is not the world's next AIDS,' said Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Tom Frieden, pictured

'We have to work now so that it is not the world's next AIDS,' said Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Tom Frieden, pictured

Experts say the most effective method of tackling the outbreak is to direct resources and funds to fighting the disease in West Africa, welcoming news the UK has vowed to deploy 750 soldiers and a medical warship to Sierra Leone.

A U.S. health chief has warned the outbreak could become the 'next Aids', unless drastic action is taken to halt the crisis.

'We have to work now so that it is not the world's next AIDS,' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Tom Frieden told the heads of the United Nations, World Bank and International Monetary Fund gathered in Washington.

'I would say that in the 30 years I've been working in public health, the only thing like this has been AIDS,' he added, warning of a 'long fight' ahead. 

Ebola virus: Five facts you didn't know about the disease

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deade

  • Thomas Eric Duncan died at 7:51am on Wednesday after receiving no potentially lifesaving blood transfusion or ZMapp
  • He was sent home when he first arrived at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital with symptoms of the disease 
  • Five other Ebola patients treated in the US are either cured or in the process of being treated at specially designed hospital wards
  • Doctors began giving Duncan an experimental antiviral drug on Monday, but it was too late 
  • Dr Kent Brantley and Nancy Writebol received the ZMapp 'miracle drug,' though officials say it has since run out
  • Dr Rick Sacra and NBC cameraman Ashoka Mukpo have received transfusions of Dr Brantley's blood
  • Duncan exposed 48 people to the disease before he was hospitalized, including his fiancée and two of her children 

EVERYONE SHOULD WATCH THIS VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekPlWCIxA_c

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The family of Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan are venting their outrage that the late Liberian may not have received the same quality of care leading up to his death Wednesday morning as the other patients treated in the U.S. for the dreaded virus.

'No one has died of Ebola in the U.S. before. This is the first time,' Duncan's furious nephew Joe Weeks told ABC.

Weeks and others in Duncan's family are calling his treatment 'unfair,' after seeing other patients pulled from the brink of death in government-funded evacuation planes and using life-saving blood transfusions and cutting edge drugs.

Five US citizens have been diagnosed with Ebola and three of them have beaten it. NBC News cameraman Ashoka Mukpo, the latest American victim, arrived at the infectious disease ward at the University of Nebraska Medical Center this week for treatment. A fourth victim, a World Health Organization doctor, is being treated in Atlanta.


Outrage: Family and loved ones of America's first Ebola death are outraged over the quality of care they believe Thomas Eric Duncan received

All five have been flown to specially designed infectious disease wards in Nebraska or Atlanta for treatment by some of the world's top doctors. 

The anger from Duncan's family also stems from what happened before Duncan was seen by doctors but after he fell ill - when the Liberian was initially turned sent home by Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital - the same hospital that later admitted him.

'What if they had taken him right away? And what if they had been able to get treatment to him earlier,' said Dallas pastor George Mason, a confidante of the family's, according to a CNN report.

While Mason told reporters that Duncan's fiance Louise Troh 'is not seeking to create any kinds of divisions in our community,' she has called for a full review of his medical care.

And none other than the Reverend Jesse Jackson appeared in public with Duncan's mother, raising the specter of legal action against the hospital as he contemned Duncan's treatment.

'He got sick and went to the hospital and was turned away, and that's the turning point here,' the Rev Jackson, a spokesman for the family, told CNN's Wolf Blitzer.

The family seem to be suggesting that further turning points would follow once Duncan finally received treatment.

When Duncan first went to Texas Presbyterian on September 25, he was sent home with a prescription for antibiotics and was never tested for Ebola, despite telling nurses that he had come from Ebola-stricken Liberia. 

Unlike Ebola victims Dr Rick Sacra and NBC cameraman Ashoka Mukpo, Duncan did not receive a transfusion of blood from American Ebola survivor Dr Kent Brantly after he was finally diagnosed.

Weeks says doctors told the family 'that the blood wasn’t a match.'

Speaking out: Louise Troh (left), Thomas Eric Duncan's fiancée, issued a statement calling for a full review of Duncan's medical care

Condemnation: Reverend Jesse Jackson, seen here with Duncan's mother, raised the specter of a lawsuit and said Duncan's care was partially to blame for his death

FIRST EBOLA DEATH IN AMERICA: WAS THE TREATMENT THOMAS DUNCAN RECEIVED INFERIOR TO THE AMERICAN-BORN VICTIMS?

Thomas Duncan was the first person to bring Ebola to the United States from West Africa accidentally, but he's one of six victims who've thus far entered the country.

And as his family and loved ones have pointed out, he's the first of the six to die.

As his grieving family weighs a potential lawsuit, here is a recap of Duncan's fellow Ebola victims, the treatment they've received and how they've fared.

PICTURED: U.S. doctor infected with Ebola virus unsteady on his feet as he is helped out of ambulance into hospital {VIDEO}

Recovered: Dr. Kent Brantly (left) and hygienist missionary Nancy Writebol (right) were the first two Ebola infected people ever brought to the United States and both have made a full recovery after receiving the experimental drug ZMapp

Recovered: Dr. Kent Brantly (left) and hygienist missionary Nancy Writebol (right) were the first two Ebola infected people ever brought to the United States and both have made a full recovery after receiving the experimental drug ZMapp

Recovered: Dr Kent Brantly (left) and hygienist missionary Nancy Writebol (right) were the first two Ebola infected people ever brought to the United States and both have made a full recovery after receiving the experimental drug ZMapp

Dr. Rick Sacra (left) was treated at a Nebraska hospital and received a blood transfusion from survivor Kent Brantly. Sacra survived and now Ashoka Mukpo (right) is in the same boat as doctors in Nebraska administer Brantly's blood to the NBC cameraman
Dr. Rick Sacra (left) was treated at a Nebraska hospital and received a blood transfusion from survivor Kent Brantly. Sacra survived and now Ashoka Mukpo (right) is in the same boat as doctors in Nebraska administer Brantly's blood to the NBC cameraman

Dr Rick Sacra (left) was treated at a Nebraska hospital and received a blood transfusion from survivor Kent Brantly. Sacra survived and now Ashoka Mukpo (right) is in the same boat as doctors in Nebraska administer Brantly's blood to the NBC News cameraman

Dr. Kent Brantly was treating Ebola victims in Liberia when he came down with the dreaded symptoms before being flown via jet to Atlanta's Emory University hospital in early August

Treatment: Brantly, 33, first received a blood transfusion from a boy who survived the virus on his own before receiving the drug ZMapp. He's since made a full recovery

Nancy Writebol worked alongside Dr. Brantly before she was diagnosed and flown to Atlanta

Treatment: Writebol, 59, was likely the first to receive ZMapp after reports arose that Brantly heroically gave up a first precious dose so that she could have it. She's since fully recovered

Dr. Rick Sacra: Sacra, 51, also became infected with Ebola in Liberia and was flown to a Nebraska hospital for treatment

Treatment: Sacra was given two transfusions of Dr. Brantly's blood and a different experimental drug called TKM-Ebola. He has fully recovered and been released

Ashoka Mukpo was a freelance NBC News cameraman in Liberia when he managed to catch Ebola before being flown to Nebraska for treatment

Treatment: Mukpo has received both a blood transfusion from Dr. Brantly and a the experimental drug brincidofovir. Doctors are hopeful the 33-year-old will recover 

Coming to America: Duncan, seen here with a female relative shortly after landing at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, traveled to the US to marry his longtime love Louise Troh

Coming to America: Duncan, seen here with a female relative shortly after landing at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, traveled to the US to marry his longtime love Louise Troh

First Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States has died

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Comment by mr1stroke on October 28, 2014 at 1:52pm

hey take no chances if any one have something against it invite them over your house and serve them dinner, nothing wrong with that

Comment by Mervin E Yearwood on October 27, 2014 at 10:04pm

Bombahdrop my sister do let fare consumue you.Go with caution, I remember your ealier post which came to pass. The sad thing it seems that the information is all over the place.

Comment by Bombahdrop on October 27, 2014 at 9:49pm

@Merv i saw your links and i cant believe what im hearing. So you mean to tell me its airborn too. smfh if its airborn we are in serious serious trouble. 

Its almost like bill deblassio is telling these workers at the restaurant to not worry about their health and well being and take a risk and serve them, and if you catch ebola from one of the nurses so be it, we'll just isolate the both of you. smdh, well mayor deblassio left them no choice so they are either going to quit or continue working there . Word on the street today was that people are reacting meaning they wont stand in certain place they think ebola is present they fear going to hospitals they dont want dr near them for fear they are infected. so yeah, definetly the streets are talking bout this mess the government set out for the poor. i saw a t-shirt online that read

This is Obamas gift to America "Ebola" smfh and i believe it because he is not doing anything to prevent the spread , everyone else closed there airports to africa and America still being exposed and exploited with this ebola mess. 

Comment by Bombahdrop on October 27, 2014 at 9:36pm

THink about it everytime they have breaking news its somebody with ebola who came straight from sierra leon like really and they are still aloud to travel here or anywhere for that matter. and the f***** up s*** is we all face quarantine trap whereever they put you and you cant help but to feel like you been imprisoned against your will. nobody would have to be quarantine if they stop allowing it to spread through transport.

Comment by Bombahdrop on October 27, 2014 at 9:31pm

These people in charge are handling this s*** all wrong. its a pandemic for crying out loud! Not even Drs can control this s***, none of them.  it wasnt until they reported two white doctors got infected down there and transported back to Us soil and the s*** has been spreading slowly but surely and heading for disaster because they are not going about the containment in the right way. They arent even organized when it comes to quarantine. im still trippin thats its here all because they brought  those f****** doctors over here and they keep letting people in ebola ravaged countries into Uninfected territory, risking uninfected with the infected thats f***** up for real.  

Comment by Bombahdrop on October 27, 2014 at 9:11pm

Mankind has turned so wicked and foul and corrupt in everyway that i would not rule out the Wrath of God is upon man for not respecting nothing he created for us and for not valuing Humanity especially.

Comment by Mervin E Yearwood on October 27, 2014 at 5:14pm

Comment by Bombahdrop on October 27, 2014 at 3:53pm

Jamaica,Trinidad,antigua and all of them islands there Locked down their city, No body from Africa can come there,  what is Obama waiting for, on the other hand how can you quarantine yourself from ebola if its already there, all around us. The longer america waits to stop africans coming from guinea sierra leon and all them places in africa, were gonna be just as ravaged as africa watch.   

Comment by Bombahdrop on October 25, 2014 at 8:09am

The Government, the Doctors, scientist, they all knew this s*** got out of hand way before those two Doctors got infected and transported to U.S soil. The border, the airports everything should have been shut down. know its here and their solution is not to shut down everything but to allow them to keep coming, but will be screened. I was just reading an article that said that the screening process may not detect 93% of people coming in with Ebola, so whats that tell ya. smfh they are making wrong decisions and we might all pay for it sooner or later. im going to be honest im scurred . we all have to be careful when lending a hand to someone who may be ill in public, it almost feels like as humans we can not interact with one another for fear of catching Ebola. I would think twice about going near someone throwing up and sweating profusely as much as I like to help someone that's down and ill, I couldn't do it, cause I would think its EBOLA. SMH

Comment by Bombahdrop on October 25, 2014 at 7:58am

It really is a false sense of reassurance to say they will not stop transportation, instead  highten screening. This is an issue we really need to vote on or reckon with in some way because as a citizen of ones country we don't have a say when we are clearly being ignored that we think its safer to quarantine our countries from the spread. Its not fair, its like they are saying f*** us.   

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