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Botham Jean's neighbor 'assassinated', as family lawyer refuses to rule out police involvement in the shooting death of the 28-Y-O days after his witness testimony helped convict cop Amber Guyger

Amber Guyger sentenced to 10 years for shooting death of Botham Jean; brother offers forgiveness in emotional gesture Botham Jean's neighbor Joshua Brown was 'assassinated', lawyer says

  • Joshua Brown, 28, was shot dead outside an apartment complex in Dallas, Texas on Friday
  • He lived in the same apartment complex where Amber Guyger shot dead Botham Jean last year
  • Brown had testified last week during Guyger's murder trial before she was convicted and sentenced to 10 years in prison
  • Brown's family attorney, S. Lee Merritt, said he was targeted in an 'assassination'
  • He is refusing to rule out if police were somehow involved in Brown's shooting
  • Witnesses say they heard several gunshots and saw a silver sedan speeding out of the apartment complex's parking lot shortly after Brown was shot
  • Dallas Police Chief Renee Hall said: 'There are no suspects or motives at this time. We are committed to solving this case’ 

Amber Guyger witness Joshua Brown was targeted for death in an 'assassination,' his family's lawyer told DailyMail.com in an exclusive interview Sunday.

And S. Lee Merritt said he is refusing to rule out that police were somehow involved in the shooting that took Brown's life just two days after his evidence had helped convict the Dallas cop of the murder of neighbor Botham Jean in a nationally watched trial.

'It is a possibility,' Merritt said. 'I don't have any evidence other than the timing, but I am not ruling anything out.

'But what I do know is that Joshua was targeted. This was an assassination. He pulled into his parking lot and he was shot. The perpetrators fled. They didn't steal anything from him.

'This is a kid who had no gang ties, there was no lover's quarrel. He was an AirBnB host and roofer. All the usual suspects of crime, drugs and sex are simply not there.'

Dallas Police Chief Renee Hall said in a statement Sunday afternoon:  There are no suspects or motives at this time. We are committed to solving this case and will work diligently to apprehend the individuals responsible for Brown’s death.’ 

Joshua Brown
S. Lee Merritt

Joshua Brown, 28, was shot dead outside an apartment complex in Dallas, Texas on Friday and his family's attorney S. Lee Merritt has called it an 'assassination'.

Police respond to shooting of key witness in Botham Jean trial

Merritt described Brown as 'a truly genuine soul that was loved deeply by his family and friends.'

'I will work to get to the bottom of his murder,' he added.

Brown, 28, was shot in the parking lot of the Atera apartment complex in Dallas's upscale Medical District around 10:30 pm on Friday. He was rushed to nearby Parkland Memorial Hospital, where he died from his injuries.

Witnesses say they heard several gunshots and saw a silver sedan speeding out of the apartment complex's parking lot shortly after.

Merritt said he was originally told Brown had been shot in the mouth and chest, although he now says he is waiting for confirmation of the bullet wounds from the Medical Examiner.

His Saturday tweet claiming Brown had been shot in the mouth led to dozens of online comments that he had been killed because he had given evidence against a police officer and that shooting him in the mouth was a message to others.

'This has 'HIT' by 'COP' written all over it,' tweeted Twitter user DJW in reply to Merritt's message.

And 'Maximus' wrote: 'All it takes is common sense to know what 'group' of individuals had him murdered.

Amber Guyger
Prosecutors say Jean (pictured) was sitting in his living room, eating a bowl of vanilla ice cream when Guyger walked into his home and shot him

Brown lived in the same Dallas apartment complex where Amber Guyger (left) shot dead Botham Jean (right) last year 

Brown had testified last week during Guyger's murder trial before she was convicted and sentenced to 10 years in prison

'They think they are above the law,' the tweeter said, adding that the Department of Justice and Dallas Police Internal Affairs should be compelled to 'root out the murderer and all those involved.'

Brown lived across the hall from Jean on the fourth floor of the South Side Flats complex on Lamar Street in Dallas. He relocated to the Atera, a 10-minute drive away, following Jean's killing last year.

'He moved because he didn't want to continue living in a building where there had been a murder,' said Merritt.

Guyger, who had been on the Dallas Police for five years, mistakenly walked into Jean's apartment instead of her own which was one floor below — on September 6 last year, and shot him with her service revolver, thinking he was an intruder.

She had just come off a 13½-hour work shift and claimed she was tired and drove to the wrong level of the parking lot.

During his September 24 testimony, Brown said police had knocked on both his door and Jean's on the afternoon of the shooting about a noise complaint, even though there wasn't anything loud going on in their apartments.

He said he thought it might have been because both he and Jean smoked marijuana and the smell sometimes drifted into the hallway.

That night, Brown left his apartment to go watch a football game and when he came back just before 10pm he heard two gunshots and a commotion in the hallway.

Mother of Botham Jean breaks down as she relives watching son's deathActivists are calling the murder of Joshua Brown (pictured) an 'execution' and offering a $100,000 reward to find his killers as it's revealed the 28-year-old who testified against Amber Guyger predicted his own death

Activists are calling the murder of Joshua Brown (pictured) an 'execution' and offering a $100,000 reward to find his killers as it's revealed the 28-year-old who testified against Amber Guyger predicted his own death 

Brown was  gunned down outside an apartment complex in the city's Medical District - not the complex where he lived with Guyger and Jean

The 'Atera' apartment complex in Dallas is pictured above where Joshua Brown was murdered Friday night

The 'Atera' apartment complex in Dallas is pictured above where Joshua Brown was murdered Friday night

He said he looked through his peep hole and saw Guyger crying on the phone in the hallway and telling whoever she was speaking to that she had gone into the wrong apartment.

He said she went back into the apartment and then came out again to meet officers arriving at the scene.

Bill Perkins, a Houston-based hedge fund manager, poker player and film producer, on Sunday offered a $100,000 reward to help find Brown's killers

Bill Perkins, a Houston-based hedge fund manager, poker player and film producer, on Sunday offered a $100,000 reward to help find Brown's killers

Brown started sobbing on the witness stand when he was asked about the victim. He said he'd met Jean for the first time on the day he was killed but was used to hearing the 26-year-old sing gospel music and Drake songs in the mornings.

Judge Tammy Kemp — who was later heavily criticized for hugging Guyger and giving her a Bible after the trial was over — called a recess and appeared to be choking back tears as Brown left the courtroom.

Guyger was off duty but still in uniform when she walked into Jean's home and shot him in the chest as he sat on his couch eating ice cream and watching TV.

The officer told investigators that she'd come home from her long shift and parked on the fourth floor of her apartment complex's garage — rather than the third floor where she'd been living for two months — and found the apartment's door ajar.

Believing she was at her own apartment and seeing a silhouette of a figure who didn't respond to verbal commands, Guyger said she fired two shots, killing him.

Bill Perkins, a Houston-based hedge fund manager, poker player and film producer, on Sunday offered a $100,000 reward to help find Brown's killers.

Botham Jean's brother gives Guyger hug after 10 year sentencing

Perkins tweeted: 'Every murder is sad. The particulars around this specific set of circumstances make it important that everyone learn why this happened irrespective of the outcome.

'Either way a killer needs to be caught & I wish in every case these resources could be brought to bear for justice.'

Merritt told DailyMail.com such rewards can often shake loose information that might otherwise not be forthcoming.

Following Brown's death, Dallas County prosecutor Jason Hermus, who led the prosecution at Guyer's trial, paid tribute to him for agreeing to take the stand.

'He bravely came forward to testify when others wouldn't. If we had more people like him, we would have a better world,' Hermus stated.

Politicians also had their say on Brown's murder. New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tweeted: Just when we caught a glimpse of justice for Botham Jean, much of it feels stolen back with the murder of Joshua Brown, a key witness in the case.

'My heart breaks for his family and for everyone touched by this tragedy. We must get to the bottom of this injustice.'

And Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris added on Twitter: 'We grieve again learning of Joshua's murder. I pray for his family, his community, and all those impacted by this tragedy. We demand answers.'

Amber Guyger found guilty for the 2018 murder of her neighbor

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White cop Amber Guyger is found GUILTY of murdering her black male neighbor who she shot dead in his apartment 'after thinking it was her own' - and faces a prison sentence of up to 99 YEARS

Brendt Jean, brother of Botham Jean hugs Amber Guyger, who was convicted of murder and sentenced to 10 years. (Screengrab)

Amber Guyger, the former Dallas police officer who was convicted of murdering Botham Jean, her upstairs neighbor who she shot to death when she entered it, thinking it was her apartment and that he was a burglar was sentenced to 10 years in prison Wednesday.

But in a show of compassion during the victim’s impact statement phase, Jean’s brother Brandt, 18, offered his forgiveness and then hugged her in the middle of the courtroom.

“I want the best for you, because I know that’s what Botham would want for you and that’s to give your life to Christ…I love you as a person and I don’t wish anything bad on you,” he said before requesting that Judge Tammy Kemp allow him to give her a hug. She collapsed in tears in his arms.

The Dallas County jury of 10 nonwhites and 2 whites came up with the sentence after about 90 minutes of deliberating. They rejected the “sudden passion” defense, which suggested there was a heavy emotional circumstance rather than premeditation. The sentencing range was between 5 and 99 years.

With the murder conviction, she would be eligible for parole after half her sentence is served. It is unclear if there will be an appeal although legal experts have said it could be expected.

Guyger herself requested that if found guilty, a jury hand down her sentence rather than the trial judge. The same jurors found the ex-cop guilty after about five hours of deliberation on Tuesday, much to the elation of those who had watched the case closely for months. Some showed frustration outside the courtroom, though after the sentence was read.

But Jean’s mother, Allison was stern with her response to the sentencing and did not mention forgiving Guyger, as her youngest son did, but focused on the mistakes made by the Dallas police force.

“That 10 years in prison is 10 year for her reflection and for her to change her life,” said Jean. But there is much more to be done by the city of Dallas. The corruption that we saw during this process must stop, but it must stop for you.

“The poor use of what should have been training is what we see coming out of this case,” she continued. “That should never happen again. If this was applied in the way that it ought to have been taught, my son would be alive today.”

At a press conference, Dallas County District Attorney John Creuzot said his office has improved their investigative work on police shootings and expressed satisfaction with the verdict and the sentence.

“After the evidence they were given many, many instructions to their benefit, which could have resulted in a not guilty,” he said. “They rejected those, they returned a verdict of guilty.”

The trial drew wide attention partly because it was another example  of an unarmed Black man being shot to death by a police officer under dubious circumstances (at the very least). In this case, many were surprised by the verdict because of the rarity of a conviction, or even charges against an officer.

It is the second major conviction of a police officer this year, following the case of Mohamed Noor, a Somali-American member of the Minneapolis police force who shot to death Justine Ruszczyk Damond in 2017. He was sentenced to 12 ½ years in prison for the killing.

After two days of testimony from Jean’s mother and also his father Bertrum, his sister, Alissa Finley and others, including friends and colleagues, jurors determined that Guyger, 31, deserved the years handed down after her defense lawyers attempted to get a minimal sentence.

“My life has not been the same… like a roller coaster. I cannot sleep. I cannot eat. It’s just been the most terrible time for me,” said Jean’s mother through tears. “I’ve been sick often. But I have to try to keep the family together, because everyone is in pain.”

At one point she tearfully recalled the time her son surprised her in Saint Lucia for Mother’s Day, sharing, “He surprised me. I heard his voice. I thought I was dreaming. He came all the way from Arkansas to Saint Lucia to surprise me.”

Prosecutors used her disciplinary record and texts and social media posts to show that her sentence should not be light. In one example, they brought up jokes she made at a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade including one in which she texts, “just push them…or spray your pepper spray in that general area.” 

During the trial defense lawyers tried to convince jurors that Guyger legitimately believed she was defending herself since she thought she was in her own apartment. They tried to use the Castle Doctrine, which supports defending oneself while in their own home, but prosecutors managed to prove that it Guyger could reasonably have determined she was in the wrong place before she started shooting.

On Sept. 6, 2018, according to police reports and court documents, Guyger a four-year Dallas police veteran, had come home from a 13-hour shift and had gone to an apartment directly above her own. She was off duty, but still in uniform when she went to the door. It was unlocked and not latched correctly when she tried to enter it.

According to an affidavit, Guyger saw that the apartment was dark and thinking a shadow she saw across the room, she drew her weapon, gave verbal commands, then fired twice, striking Jean, 26, in the chest.

Neighbors in the residential complex, located not far from downtown Dallas, testified in the trial that they did not hear Guyger shouting normal commands that an officer would issue when encountering an offender, but they did hear indistinct shouting and finally two gunshots.

Guyger called 911 and as she turned on the lights, she testified, she realized she was in the wrong apartment. She began to attempt to revive Jean, and as officers arrived they attempted CPR. He was taken to an area hospital and later pronounced dead.

Days later, Guyger was arrested and charged with manslaughter, and within weeks was fired by the Dallas Police Department. In November 2018, she was indicted for murder.

With the sentencing, many feel a corner has been turned and a precedent has been set for conviction of police in the shooting death of unarmed Blacks.

But though rare, this is also not the first time for such a conviction.

In addition to the Noor case, last year, ex-Balch Springs, Tex. officer Roy Oliver was found guilty and sentenced to 15 years behind bars for the shooting death of 17-year-old Jordan Edwards, who was leaving a party when he was fatally wounded in the passenger seat of a car.

In 2017, Michael Slager a former North Charleston, S.C., officer was sentenced to 20 years in prison for the shooting death of Walter Scott. In that incident, video showed Slager shooting Scott in the back as he ran away.

Also, former San Francisco bay area transit cop Johannes Mehserle, was convicted of shooting Oscar Grant to death at an Oakland, Calif., train station. He served 11 months of a two year sentence. The incident formed the basis for the 2013 film Fruitvale Station.

Further back, two ex-Detroit police officers Larry Nevers and Walter Budzyn were convicted of second degree murder in the beating death of Malice Green in 1992 outside of a drug house. Both men appealed their convictions and in 1997 the Michigan Supreme Court overturned Budzyn’s conviction. After several more appeals, Nevers was released from prison in 2001. He died in 2013.

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Guyger broke down in tears when she took to the stand during the trial and apologized for shooting dead her neighbor

  • Amber Guyger, 31, was convicted of murder on Tuesday after she shot dead her black neighbor Botham Jean, 26, in his Dallas apartment
  • A jury reached the unanimous verdict in the high-profile trial after six days 
  • The murder charge brings a prison sentence of between five and 99 years
  • Loud cheers erupted in the courtroom after the judge read out the jury's verdict
  • Guyger sat alone, weeping, at the defense table as a sheriff's deputy appeared to stroke and fix her hair  
  • Guyger, a four-year veteran with Dallas Police, was off duty but still in uniform when she fatally shot Jean in his home on the evening of September 6, 2018
  • She told investigators that after a 13.5 hour shift she mistakenly entered the wrong apartment and shot Jean thinking he was an intruder
  • Prosecutors argued that Guyger should have known she was on the wrong floor and questioned why she didn't radio in for help
  • They said she had non-lethal tools on her service belt at the time, including a stun gun and pepper spray
  • Her defense attorneys tried to argue that Guyger fired her gun in self-defense based on the belief that Jean was a burgla
  • A sheriff's deputy inside the courtroom appeared to stroke and fix Guyger's hair immediately after the guilty verdict was read out
  • Grand jury indicts white Dallas police officer for MURDER in shooti...

White former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger could be facing decades in prison after being convicted of murder in the fatal shooting of her black, unarmed neighbor who she said she believed was an intruder in her home. 

The same jury that unanimously found Guyger guilty in the September 2018 death of her upstairs neighbor, Botham Jean, will consider her fate after hearing additional testimony on Tuesday afternoon. 

The jury took just a matter of hours to convict the 31-year-old on Tuesday following a six-day trial. 

Loud cheers erupted in the courtroom from Jean's family as the verdict was announced with someone yelling 'Thank you, Jesus!' In the hallway outside the courtroom, a crowd celebrated and shouted 'black lives matter'. When the prosecutors walked into the hall, they broke into cheers. 

Guyger sat alone, weeping, at the defense table. A sheriff's deputy appeared to stroke and fix her hair after the verdict was read out. 

During the sentencing phase, Guyger's defense attorneys can argue that she deserves a light sentence because she acted out of sudden fear and confusion. 

The judge is expected to provide guidance on sentencing law. In Texas, the sentence for murder is from five to 99 years in prison. The state does not officially use the term first-degree murder.

Ahead of jury deliberations, Judge Tammy Kemp instructed the jury to decide if Guyger shooting dead her neighbor was reasonable under the circumstances. If not, they then had to decide between a murder or manslaughter charge.

It is not yet clear how long the punishment phase of the trial will last. 

Jean's mother, Allison Jean, took to the stand on Tuesday afternoon to testify about how she was affected by the killing of her son.  

Botham Jean
Amber Guyger

White Dallas police officer Amber Guyger has been found guilty of murder after she fatally shot her unarmed black neighbor, Botham Jean, after claiming she mistook his apartment for her own in September last year

A sheriff's deputy inside the courtroom appeared to stroke and fix Guyger's hair immediately after the guilty verdict was read out

Black police officer fixes Guyger's hair after guilty verdict

The basic facts of the unusual shooting were never in dispute throughout the trial. 

Guyger, a four-year veteran with Dallas Police, was off duty but still in uniform when she fatally shot Jean in his home on the evening of September 6, 2018.

She told investigators that after a 13.5 hour shift she parked on the fourth floor of her apartment complex's garage - rather than the third floor where she lived - and found the apartment's door unlocked.

Believing she was at her own apartment and seeing a silhouette of a figure who didn't respond to verbal commands, Guyger said she fired two shots at Jean that killed him.

Jean, a 26-year-old accountant, had been eating a bowl of ice cream on the couch before Guyger entered his home. 

Prosecutors argued during the trial that Guyger should have noticed she was on the wrong floor and that she missed missed numerous signs before entering the apartment. 

They suggested she was distracted by sexually explicit phone messages with her police partner and also questioned why Guyger didn't radio in for help when she thought there was a break-in at her home instead of entering the apartment with her gun drawn. 

Prosecutors pointed out that Guyger, given she was still in uniform, had a number of non-lethal items attached to her service belt at the time of the shooting, including a stun gun and pepper spray. 

Her defense attorneys, however, said she fired in self-defense based on the belief that Jean was a burglar. 

They argued in their closing statements on Monday that her belief she was killing an intruder in her home was entirely reasonable and the shooting was a result of 'a series of horrible mistakes'. 

In a frantic 911 call played repeatedly during the trial, Guyger said 'I thought it was my apartment' nearly 20 times. Her lawyers argued that the identical physical appearance of the apartment complex from floor to floor frequently led to tenants to the wrong apartments. 

Amber Guyger found guilty for the 2018 murder of her neighborBotham Jean's mother, Allison Jean, rejoices in the courtroom after Guyger was found guilty of murder

Botham Jean's mother, Allison Jean, rejoices in the courtroom after Guyger was found guilty of murder

Loud cheers erupted in the courtroom from Jean's family (above after the verdict) after Judge Tammy Kemp read out the jury's verdict

The jury that convicted Guyger was largely made up of women and people of color. 

Jean, who grew up in the Caribbean island nation of St. Lucia, came to the U.S. for college and starting his career as an accountant. 

His shooting drew widespread attention because of the strange circumstances and because it was one in a string of shootings of unarmed black men by white police officers.

'A 26-year-old college-educated black man, certified public accountant, working for one of the big three accounting firms in the world ... it shouldn't take all of that for unarmed black and brown people in America to get justice,' Benjamin Crump, one of the lawyers for Jean's family, said at a news conference on Tuesday.

Crump said the verdict honors other people of color who were killed by police officers who were not convicted of a crime.

Attorney Lee Merritt, who also represents the family, underlined Crump's words.

'This is a huge victory, not only for the family of Botham Jean, but this is a victory for black people in America. It's a signal that the tide is going to change here. Police officers are going to be held accountable for their actions, and we believe that will begin to change policing culture around the world,' Merritt said. 

Guyger was arrested three days after the killing and then fired from the Dallas Police Department. She was initially charged with manslaughter before a grand jury indicted her for murder. 

Jurors were allowed to consider a manslaughter charge in their verdict, which can carry between two and 20 years behind bars. 

The judge ruled on Monday that jurors could also consider Castle Doctrine, otherwise known as stand your ground, when considering their verdict. The law allows a person to use deadly force in protecting a home if someone is trying to forcibly enter.   

Guyger sits alone as attorneys from both sides speak to Judge Tammy Kemp moments after the Dallas cop was found guilty of murder

Guyger sits alone as attorneys from both sides speak to Judge Tammy Kemp moments after the Dallas cop was found guilty of murder

Guyger is pictured leaving the courtroom after she was found guilty of murder. The jury is expected to return on Tuesday afternoon for the punishment phase of the trial 

'I was scared he was going to kill me': Amber Guyger sobbed as she testified during her trial

Guyger broke down in tears when she took to the stand during the trial last week and apologized for shooting dead her neighbor.

Her testimony marked the first time the public heard directly from her since Jean's killing. She told the jury she wished Jean had been the one to kill her instead of the other way around.

Amber Guyger was indicted on a murder charge by a grand jury

Guyger was arrested three days after the killing and then fired from the Dallas Police Department. She was initially charged with manslaughter before a grand jury indicted her for murder 

During her testimony, Guyger reenacted the moment she arrived at the wrong apartment thinking it was her own.

She said she put her key in the apartment lock and the door opened because it hadn't been fully closed.   

Guyger said she immediately drew her gun because she thought someone was in her home. She testified that she was 'scared to death' when she opened the door fully and saw a silhouetted figure standing in the darkness inside. 

She told the jury she shouted at Jean: 'Let me see your hands, let me see your hands'.

Guyger explained she couldn't see his hands and that he began coming toward her at a 'fast-paced' walk, yelling 'hey, hey, hey' in an 'aggressive voice'. 

She said that is when she fired her gun twice.  

'I was scared he was going to kill me,' she said. 

She said she intended to kill him when she pulled the trigger because that's what she had been trained to do as a police officer. 

During her testimony, she recounted police training that focused on learning to control suspects and the importance of seeing their hands, which kicked in as she spotted Jean.  

Guyger broke down in tears when she took to the stand during the trial and apologized for shooting dead her neighbor
Prosecutor Jason Hermus asked Guyger to aim the gun at him like she did the night of the shooting during her murder trial
With her heavy service vest, lunch bag, and her backpack in her left arm, Guyger showed jurors how she entered the apartment the night of the shooting

With her heavy service vest, lunch bag, and her backpack in her left arm, Guyger showed jurors how she entered the apartment the night of the shooting (right). Under cross examination, prosecutor Jason Hermus asked Guyger to aim the gun at him like she did the night of the shooting during her murder trial (left)

TIMELINE OF THE AMBER GUYGER CASE

September 6, 2018: Botham Jean, a 27-year-old accountant at PwC, was sitting on his couch eating ice cream when Amber Guyger entered his apartment and shot him.

September 9, 2018: Guyger is charged with manslaughter and is put on administrative leave from her job. Guyger, who was still in uniform, told investigators that she had finished a 13.5 hour shift and mistakenly parked on the fourth floor instead of the third floor. She said she found the door of the apartment she thought was hers 'slightly ajar'. She entered the apartment and fired two shots when she was a figure coming towards her.

September 13, 2018: Jean's funeral is held at the Greenville Avenue Church of Christ in Dallas.

September 24, 2018: Guyger is fired from the Dallas Police Department.

November 30, 2018: Guyger is indicted on a murder charge by a grand jury.

September 23, 2019: Guyger's murder trial begins in Dallas. Over the next week, jurors were shown body cam footage and 911 call from the night of the shooting. Jurors also hear from neighbors, Dallas PD officers and crime scene analysts.

September 26, 2019: Guyger testifies in her own defense saying she was 'scared to death' when she encountered Jean in what she allegedly believed to be her own apartment. 

September 30, 2019: Prosecutors and defense deliver closing arguments. Jury starts deliberating. 

October 1, 2019: Guyger is found guilty of murder.

When asked how she felt about killing an innocent man, she said through tears: 'No police officer ever would want to hurt an innocent person.  

'I feel like a terrible person. I feel like a piece of cr**. I hate that I have to live with this every single day of my life. I feel like I don't deserve the chance to be with my family and friends.

'I wish he was the one with the gun and had killed me. I never wanted to take an innocent person's life. I am so sorry. This is not about hate, it's about being scared that night.' 

It is relatively rare for criminal defendants to testify in their own defense at trial given prosecutors can cross-examine them. Legal experts said Guyger's lawyers may have wanted to her to testify to make her appear human. 

Defense attorneys questioned Guyger about her childhood and her aspirations to become a police officer. 

'I just wanted to help people and that was the one career that I thought I could help people in,' Guyger said. 

Guyger told the jury that police work was 'the one thing I wanted to do since I was little'. 

Prosecutors, however, cast doubt on Guyger's grief and wondered why she didn't call for backup instead of confronting Jean and questioned her attempts to save his life. 

When prosecutors asked Guyger why she didn't radio in for help when she thought there was a break-in at what she thought was her home, she replied that going through the doorway with her gun drawn 'was the only option that went through my head'.

The prosecutor also grilled Guyger about why she didn't perform 'proper CPR' on Jean after she shot him. 

He asked about an eight-hour de-escalation training course she had taken that April, but Guyger told the jury she could no longer remember what she learned in the course. 

She said she performed some chest compressions on Jean with one hand while using her phone with the other, but she also acknowledged stopping several times.  

Prosecutors suggested that Guyger was less than grief-stricken in the aftermath of the shooting, saying that two days after she shot Jean, she asked her police partner, with whom she was romantically involved, if he wanted to go for drinks.

Guyger admitted that she sent flirtatious, sexually-orientated messages to Martin Rivera and talked about getting drunk. The court heard that Rivera is married and has children.

She testified that they had a yearlong relationship, which she ended because it was 'morally wrong'.

'Super horny today': Guyger sent explicit texts to police partner and lover the day of the shooting but later deleted them 

In addition to the texts Guyger sent her lover after the shooting, prosecutors revealed during the trial that she had also exchanged sexually explicit messages and photos the day she shot dead Jean. 

Prosecutors suggested during the trial that Guyger was distracted by sexually explicit phone messages with her police partner Martin Rivera before the shooting. She also sent two text messages to him immediately after the shooting. Both Rivera and Guyger deleted the texts soon after

Prosecutors suggested during the trial that Guyger was distracted by sexually explicit phone messages with her police partner Martin Rivera before the shooting. She also sent two text messages to him immediately after the shooting. Both Rivera and Guyger deleted the texts soon after

Prosecutors said Guyger sent a message to Rivera saying she was 'super horny today' and a Snapchat message saying 'Wanna touch?' just hours before the shooting.

Just prior to the shooting, prosecutors said Guyger was on the phone with Rivera for 16 minutes as she headed back to to her apartment.

Prosecutors made the argument that Guyger was distracted by her phone conversation with Rivera when she mistook Jean's apartment for hers.

Rivera took to the stand during the trial and told jurors that their conversation was was mostly about police work but his memory of the call was hazy. 

He denied the prosecutor's suggestion that he had made any plans to rendezvous with Guyger later that night.  

Prosecutors said that after the shooting, Guyger sent two text messages to her partner while she was simultaneously on the phone to 911 as Jean was bleeding to death on his floor.

She had texted him to say 'I'm f**ked' and that she needed him in the minutes after she shot Jean, the court heard. 

Guyger deleted the logs of her text exchanges with Rivera from her cellphone after the shooting.

Rivera said he didn't not know why she had done that but admitted that he had also deleted their text exchanges.

Guyger later testified that she deleted the texts between her and her partner because she was ashamed to be in a relationship with him. 

She added that she had deleted texts between them before. 

Body cam footage showed first responders performing CPR on victim as Guyger stood outside in the hallway on her phone 

In the frantic 911 call played in court early in the trial, Guyger - who was later fired from the force - can be heard saying 'I thought it was my apartment' nearly 20 times.

She also says: 'I'm gonna lose my job' and 'I am going to need a supervisor.'

'I'm f****d. Oh my God. I'm sorry,' Guyger says in the recording.

Throughout the call, she also spoke to Jean, called him 'bud' and encouraged him to stay alive.

Officers arrive at scene after Amber Guyger shot Botham JeanGuyger was shown (left) in police body camera footage (played to the jury during her murder trial on Tuesday) as first responders arrived to the Dallas apartment where she shot her neighbor Botham Jean last year

Guyger was shown (left) in police body camera footage (played to the jury during her murder trial on Tuesday) as first responders arrived to the Dallas apartment where she shot her neighbor Botham Jean last year

Guyger was captured on an officer's body cam standing in the corridor outside on her phone as CPR was being given to Jean inside, according to prosecutors

Guyger was captured on an officer's body cam standing in the corridor outside on her phone as CPR was being given to Jean inside, according to prosecutors  

Jurors were also shown footage from a body camera worn by one of two officers who arrived at the apartment after Guyger called 911 to report the shooting.

Officers could be seen running towards Jean's apartment as Guyger screamed out that she was off-duty. 

Guyger was standing near the front door when the officers arrived and could be heard saying: 'I thought it was my apartment'.

The footage showed the two officers immediately rendering CPR to Jean who was shown lying on the floor surrounded by blood.

Guyger appeared to be pushed out of the apartment while the officers gave Jean first aid.

A different body cam image showed Guyger standing in hallway outside the apartment looking at her phone as CPR was being administered.

Guyger was criticized by prosecutors during the trial for not rendering aid to Jean after she shot him.

Assistant District Attorney Jason Hermus asked her: 'Why couldn't you have given him full undivided and proper attention? You can put the phone on speaker phone'.

She replied: 'I had so much racing through my head'. 

Other footage shown during the trial showed her hugging and speaking to fellow officers on the scene, which prosecutors have argued showed she was given special treatment.

Crime scene photos show Guyger had a taser and pepper spray strapped to her utility belt during shooting 

A crime scene analyst, who examined the scene and took photos of Guyger after the shooting, testified that the cop had a Taser and her pistol strapped to her at the time.

Prosecutors showed photos to the jury that analyst Robyn Carr took of Guyger inside a crime scene van after she fatally shot Jean.

Guyger can be seen in full police uniform with her utility belt still strapped on.

Prosecutors pointed to Guyger's stun gun and the analyst confirmed that it was a Taser that 'shoots out an electric probe that gets inserted into an individual's skin'.

She also confirmed Guyger had her pistol strapped to her at the time.

Photos taken by a crime scene analyst were shown during Amber Guyger's murder trial on Wednesday. The analyst testified that this photo showed Guyger had a taser and stun gun strapped to utility belt when she shot dead Botham Jean

Photos taken by a crime scene analyst were shown during Amber Guyger's murder trial on Wednesday. The analyst testified that this photo showed Guyger had a taser and stun gun strapped to utility belt when she shot dead Botham Jean

This photo taken inside a crime scene van after Guyger fatally shot Jean shows her gun (far left), her stun gun (far right) and pepper spray (second from left) strapped to her utility belt, an analyst and investigator testified

This photo taken inside a crime scene van after Guyger fatally shot Jean shows her gun (far left), her stun gun (far right) and pepper spray (second from left) strapped to her utility belt, an analyst and investigator testified

Carr seized Guyger's gun - photos of which were also shown to the jury - as evidence in the investigation.

Texas Ranger Michael Adcock, who was among the investigators, was asked during his testimony on Thursday about the non-lethal items attached to Guyger's belt following the shooting.

He confirmed that in addition to the Taser and gun, Guyger also had OC spray - or pepper spray - on her at the time.

Prosecutors questioned Adcock about the radio attached to Guyger's belt, saying: 'If an officer is in trouble and needs immediate assistance what is the primary method of communication?'

'It's the radio, I guess,' Adcock replied.

The prosecutor asked: 'If you had a cellphone could you use that as well?' to which Adcock responded: 'Yes, sir'.

Under cross examination, Adcock said he wouldn't use a stun gun or pepper spray if he believed he was in a deadly force situation and would use a handgun.

Neighbors 'often went to the wrong floor in their Dallas building' - as investigator testified layout of the two apartments were similar and that victim's door had a structural flaw 

Footage and still images were shown in court of Guyger's apartment that were taken by multiple investigators in the days after the shooting.

The footage showed the view of her apartment from the entryway to her home and also panned to show views of the living room.

Prosecutors made the argument that the apartment looked different to the victim's home. They noted there were flowers on a small table and a large clock inside Guyger's home.

But Texas Ranger David Armstrong - who was a lead investigator - testified that Guyger's apartment had a similar layout to the neighbor she shot.

During his testimony, defense attorneys showed photos to the jury that compared Guyger's apartment layout to that of Jean's home.

Jurors were shown photos during the trial that compared Guyger's apartment layout to that of Jean's home. Pictured above is Jean's apartment in the days after his death

Jurors were shown photos during the trial that compared Guyger's apartment layout to that of Jean's home. Pictured above is Jean's apartment in the days after his death

An investigator testified that the layouts of the apartment were the same and that both Guyger and Jean had their couch and TVs in the same position. Prosecutors, however, noted that the apartments looked different. Pictured above is Guyger's apartment in the days after the shooting

An investigator testified that the layouts of the apartment were the same and that both Guyger and Jean had their couch and TVs in the same position. Prosecutors, however, noted that the apartments looked different. Pictured above is Guyger's apartment in the days after the shooting

Armstrong said both Guyger and Jean had their couch and TVs in the same position.

Photos comparing views of the hallways, parking garages and doorways on the third and fourth floor of the apartment complex were also shown to the court.

When questioned by defense attorneys, Armstrong agreed that they looked similar.

Armstrong also testified that the door of Jean's apartment did not close properly because it had a structural flaw.

At the time of her arrest, Guyger said she had found the door of the apartment she thought was hers 'slightly ajar'.

She claimed the door opened when she used her electronic key to enter the apartment and she believed she was being robbed when she saw Jean.

Armstrong said it appeared the screws in the strike plate of Jean's door had been screwed in too far, which caused it to 'bow out'.

This flaw prevented the door from closing properly as it was designed to do, Armstrong told the court.

He said it meant that the door would sometimes latch but other times it wouldn't secure and close properly.

Defense attorneys said Jean's door was open the day Guyger entered his apartment and shot him dead.

The door of the Dallas apartment where Amber Guyger shot dead her neighbor after saying she mistakenly thought it was her own had a structural flaw that caused it not to latch and close properly, an investigator testified. The images above were taken by authorities during their investigation

The door of the Dallas apartment where Amber Guyger shot dead her neighbor after saying she mistakenly thought it was her own had a structural flaw that caused it not to latch and close properly, an investigator testified. The images above were taken by authorities during their investigation 

The investigator said it appeared the screws in the strike plate had been screwed in too far, which caused it to 'bow out'. Pictured above is a photo of the strike plate that was shown to jurors on Wednesday

The investigator said it appeared the screws in the strike plate had been screwed in too far, which caused it to 'bow out'. Pictured above is a photo of the strike plate that was shown to jurors on Wednesday

He said it meant that the door would sometimes latch but other times it wouldn't secure and close properly
The investigator said this flaw prevented the door from closing properly as it was designed to do

The investigator said this flaw prevented the door from closing properly as it was designed to do. He said it meant that the door would sometimes latch but other times it wouldn't secure and close properly

Armstrong went on to testify that he doesn't think Guyger committed a crime.

'I don't believe that (the shooting) was reckless or criminally negligent based on the totality of the investigation and the circumstances and facts,' Armstrong said.

The jury wasn't present when he said he believed she acted reasonably after perceiving Jean as a threat. The judge later ruled that the jury couldn't hear the Texas Ranger's opinion of the reasonableness of Guyger's actions.

In the jury's presence, Armstrong testified that going to the wrong apartment was common at that complex.

Armstrong said he interviewed 297 of the 349 residents living at the apartment complex. He said 46 of those residents had mistakenly gone to the wrong floor and put their key in the door before.

The percentage was higher for those living on the third and fourth floors - the same floors as Guyger and Jean - with 38 saying they had unintentionally walked to the wrong apartment.

Armstrong also said that 93 of the residents had parked on the wrong floor in the parking garage on previous occasions. He said 76 of those residents lived on the third or fourth floor.

Botham's death sparks outrage as he is remembered as a passionate man and his family accuse police of trying to 'assassinate his character' 

Botham Jean was a native of St. Lucia who was working in Dallas for PricewaterhouseCoopers - an accounting and consulting firm.

He had come to the U.S. in 2011 after winning a place at Harding University in Arkansas so he could remain within a religious community while getting his education.

He studied business administration and accounting and management and graduated in 2016. PwC hired him out of college as a risk assurance associate.

At his funeral, which was attended by hundreds of people, Jean was described as a talented and passionate man who excelled at everything and worked with orphans.

He had also confided to his uncle that he might one day want to be prime minister of his native Caribbean island country of St. Lucia.

'Our prince royal was snatched from us by the quick-to-trigger finger of one trained to protect and serve,' Jean's uncle, Ignatius Jean, said to applause at his funeral.

Botham Jean (front) was a native of St. Lucia who was working in Dallas for PricewaterhouseCoopers - an accounting and consulting firm

Botham Jean (front) was a native of St. Lucia who was working in Dallas for PricewaterhouseCoopers - an accounting and consulting firm

'Perhaps the good that might overcome this violent, heinous act will be that those who are trained to serve and protect will serve love and peace and not violence and bullets.'

Jean's death sparked protest and outrage in the African-American community, which saw the case as potentially another one of a white officer getting off lightly for killing a black man.

Critics, including Jean's family, wondered why it took three days for Guyger to be charged, why she was not taken into custody immediately after the shooting and whether race played a factor in her decision to use deadly force.

Guyger was arrested 72 hours after the shooting. She was initially charged with manslaughter before a grand jury chose to indict her on the more serious charge of murder. She wasn't fired from the force until two weeks after Jean's death.

Police came under fire during the investigation after the victim's family accused officers of trying to 'assassinate' Jean's character.

They also expressed fury that authorities sought a search warrant that resulted in the discovery of marijuana in the victim's apartment.

Lee Merritt, one of the Jean family attorneys, said the search warrant, which allowed investigators to look for drugs, should have never been issued.

Botham Jean leads worship at a Harding University presidential reception in Dallas back in September 2017

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Comment by rashid rourk on October 10, 2019 at 6:52pm

I thought of this speech after reading your post @conscious1...

Comment by conscious1 on October 8, 2019 at 3:22pm

ORGANIZE AND CENTRALIZE.  If you're not in an organization then join one or form your own organization.  After you have joined or formed your own organization then form a UNITED FRONT with other African American/Afro Caribbean/Afro Hispanic/ Afro African/Afro Asian/, etc. organizations.  Drop the hate we have for others who look like us and are undergoing the same conditions due to us having the same ENEMY.  Until we are ready to stand together no matter which part of the world we were born we will continue to suffer no matter where we live.  Until we all understand that we are ONE then we will stand weak alone.  Until we acknowledge a rich nation of our own that will stand for us just as Europe stands for all whites, Israell stands for all jews, China stands for all chinese, then we will continue to suffer.  A United States of Africa that will stand for all Africans throughout the diaspora should be our aim.  For once mother Africa decides to close her borders and boycott all those countries because of the abuse and murder of her children all other nations will have to bow; no diamonds, no gold, no iron ore and other precious metals which are the the blood, infrastructure and life line of all other nations will come to an immediate halt.  Until black people stop hating each other and realize that all other nations needs us, WE DON'T NEED THEM then we will continue to suffer and beg for equality no matter where we are.  IT'S EITHER YOU GET IT OR YOU DON'T, but all the anger and rambling will never change this reality.  WE ARE RICH, black people.  That's why you are hated and envied.  The sad thing is that black people are the only ones who don't know it because we are too busy running from ourselves and our true ancestral inheritance.  PEACE!!

Comment by mr1stroke on October 8, 2019 at 11:29am
In fact if you obseve, blacj peole depend on white people to survive, they dont own amything after all those years, thid is sad, what have black people been doing other than serving white people even after slavery, thats why the community is so weak, they uave no financial power, they work hard to make the money and gove it roght back to white people its that easy, look at the one with 2 jobs, seriously study the community, unless you get to the core if the problem every one will keep complaining about white people and do nothing
Comment by mr1stroke on October 8, 2019 at 11:18am
Fang negros always want to compare their struggle with others, white people been who they are from the beginning they were born to hate and they will never changed. Now about 6 millions jews died from hate they make sure they stay strong and prepare for war, they dobt love no obe especially if youre not compassionate towards holocausts, in fact tgeu are the most racist people gond out how they treat the africans and black israelites. But black accept the hate and die to love and forgive whites, they hate each other and fight as well as kill each other, how come they are are not so forgiving and loving towards rach other, so i dont boane white people i blame those who accepts and tolerates their hate, when will black people become warriors and protect their race?
Comment by Fang on October 8, 2019 at 8:18am

RIP Joshua Brown and Botham jean.

Comment by Fang on October 8, 2019 at 8:07am
  • Everyone and there grannies knows what Botham Jean thinks...WOW!!! Amazing.
Comment by Fang on October 8, 2019 at 8:02am

I often heard as a child, that deadman tells no tail...so, some please explain to me how can a man that been dead for over 2 years can tell these people how he wants the world to forgive his killer and love and embrace her. ????????????? I think this is just a start of some thing MUCH BIGGER to come and us blacks are the targets....

Comment by mr1stroke on October 7, 2019 at 4:45pm
And yes white people are right, what if those gangs in Chicago was fighting white supremacist, what if they respond like those whote people who killed that neighbor? Just what if , but that will never happen, theu are too busy killing any black person for living
Comment by mr1stroke on October 7, 2019 at 4:43pm
Niggers like you just talk and dont even understand what youre saying okay let see niggers are busy killing each other when tha last time they kill any white person or even a white cop who keep killing wait let me guess theu forgive like they did that white boy who killed the 9 church members in NC, white people making bomb gor a race war but niggers are forming gangs to kill each other, but since you know all that what exactly are saying about white killing blacks, wjats the point of your comment, what are niggers going to to do. You said stick to the topic well i did, i point how white people are always willing to fight for their cause but niggers are just weak and they talk a lot like right now, so what are you saying other than keep forgiving, uou niggers are the worse my comment said it since uou cant read do you see how quick youre willing to go off on me over a comment but you will be at some church praying with white people on sundays, you famn n*****, niggers are the worse enemy than white people, niggers live to serve white people thats why they always begging for jobs, once they have that from a white person they find Jesus, poor niggers
Comment by vaughn mitchell on October 7, 2019 at 4:01pm
While ten black people, not negro's or nuggers, was killed in the black community. White people are building bombs, stockpiling weapons for a race war. How many whitepeople were caught making bombs, and stockpiling weapons for mass destruction. Black kill blacks just like whites kill each other. This article is not about blacks killing blacks, it's about aback man getting killed because he testify about a murder that was done by a white cop. It seems to implicate police killing this man, who thought that might happen so he moved out of complex, he was in where the murder took place. But it seems their is one a****** white man on here, who some reason when white people murder innocent black people he brings up black on black crime. If you check the comments on yahoo, the racist white people say the same thing. ( look at Chicago, they keepkilling each other). It's like the white devil on here is saying we should not be upset when white people kill us because we kill each other. Stick to the f****** article. It's not about black on black crime. When whites, kill people in Mass shootings. The worst terrorist in this country are racist white people, then again some are not racist just plain evil. When white people talk about black on black crime, I just mention, Timothy Mcvay. The Oklahoma city bomber, the idiot who kill all those people in Vegas, and all the idiots who keep shooting up their schools.

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