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Ebola doctor is hailed a hero by hands-on Mayor Bill de Blasio and discharged virus-free from NY hospital… but he still can't have sex for three months {F}

Thousands dead… but it's a dog that sparks an outcry: Spanish Ebola nurse's pet Excalibur is PUT DOWN over fears it could transmit the disease, as crowd of animal lovers chants 'murderers

spencer444.jpg ebola craig spencer de blasio

  • Dr Craig Spencer, 33, was cheered by crowds of medical staff at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan as he left today
  • Doctor got hugs from Mayor Bill de Blasio and first lady Chirlane McCray
  • Dr Spencer has been warned off having sex for three months because Ebola can survive for a longer time in semen

A doctor who was diagnosed with Ebola was discharged on Tuesday after being declared virus-free following weeks of isolation treatment/

Dr Craig Spencer, 33, was cheered by crowds of medical staff at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan as he left today accompanied for Mayor Bill de Blasio and his wife Chirlane McCray.

The release of Dr Spencer who worked with Ebola patients in Guinea and had been held at Bellevue since he was diagnosed with the virus on October 23, means no one in the U.S. is being treated for the disease.

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Dr Craig Spencer, who has been declared Ebola-free, gets a hug from New York City Major Bill de Blasio on Tuesday morning while first lady Chirlane McCray looks on

Dr Craig Spencer, who has been declared Ebola-free, gets a hug from New York City Major Bill de Blasio on Tuesday morning while first lady Chirlane McCray looks on

Doctor cured of Ebola gets hug from NYC Mayor de Blasio
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio walks with Dr. Craig Spencer (right) as he is discharged from Bellevue Hospital, after being declared free of the Ebola virus, in New York on Tuesday

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio walks with Dr. Craig Spencer (right) as he is discharged from Bellevue Hospital, after being declared free of the Ebola virus, in New York on Tuesday

Mayor de Blasio addressed a press conference on Tuesday at Bellevue hospital in Manhattan where Dr Spencer (pictured right of the mayor) finished his quarantine period

Mayor de Blasio addressed a press conference on Tuesday at Bellevue hospital in Manhattan where Dr Spencer (pictured right of the mayor) finished his quarantine period

Dr Craig Spencer receives a hug from head physician Dr  Laura Evans at a news conference after he thanked her personally for taking such good care of him 

Dr Craig Spencer receives a hug from head physician Dr  Laura Evans at a news conference after he thanked her personally for taking such good care of him 

Dr Spencer appeared at a news conference on Tuesday morning where he described his time spent working for five weeks in Guinea, at the heart of the Ebola outbreak. 

He said: 'During this time,​ I cried as I held children who were not strong enough to survive the virus. 

'But,​ I also experienced immense joy when patients I treated were cured and invited me into their family as a brother upon discharge.'

After thanking the teams of medical staff who cared for him along with his friends and family, Dr Spencer said: 'While my case has garnered international attention, it is important to remember​ that my infection represents but a fraction of the more than 13,000 reported cases to date in West Africa - the center of the outbreak, where families are being torn apart and communities destroyed.'

Dr Craig Spencer leaves hospital on Tuesday with an army of doctors and health officials along with the New York mayor and his wife. The doctor was the last known person in the U.S. to have contracted Ebola while working in West Africa

Dr Craig Spencer leaves hospital on Tuesday with an army of doctors and health officials along with the New York mayor and his wife. The doctor was the last known person in the U.S. to have contracted Ebola while working in West Africa

Spencer, who traveled to West Africa with Doctors Without Borders, was joined by Mayor Bill de Blasio, city officials and Bellevue staff.

Spencer's diagnosis followed trips on the subway to eat out and go bowling with friends in Brooklyn, provoking public alarm about the possible spread of the virus in the city.

Dr Spencer thanked medical teams at Bellevue, Doctors Without Borders and his friends and damily as he was discharged on Tuesday

Dr Spencer thanked medical teams at Bellevue, Doctors Without Borders and his friends and damily as he was discharged on Tuesday

During his time holed up in Bellevue, Dr Spencer has been playing the banjo and practicing yoga, it emerged last week. 

The doctor was also reportedly keeping in shape by riding a stationary bicycle in his hospital room.

Another source told the New York Post he has been playing David Bowie and Interpol songs all day long, which has earned him the reputation as a 'total hipster' among hospital staff.

Neighbors who have not seen Spencer since he was hospitalized three weeks ago said they were happy to hear he may be headed home soon.

'I'm glad to hear he's well enough for that to happen,' one woman told NY1 television.

'The building's been through a lot and I'm sure they have been through more,' she said, referring to Spencer's fiancée, who was quarantined in the apartment until recently. 

Dr Spencer's condition was upgraded from serious to stable after he received a blood transfusion from fellow US Ebola survivor Nancy Writebol, a missionary who contracted the disease in Liberia.

The method was also used to treat Dallas nurses Amber Vinson and Nina Pham, NBC cameraman Ashoka Mukpo, Dr Nancy Writebol and Dr Rick Sacra.

Dr Spencer will now be happily reunited with his fiancée, Morgan Dixon, at their Harlem home.

Dr Spencer high-fives a supporters as he walks out of Bellevue hospital in Manhattan after being declared Ebola-free following a 21-day quarantine period

Dr Spencer high-fives a supporters as he walks out of Bellevue hospital in Manhattan after being declared Ebola-free following a 21-day quarantine period

Quarantined: Dr Spencer contracted the disease after treating patients in Guinea (left). His fiancee Morgan Dixon (right with Spencer) has been quarantined in their Harlem apartment until November 14
Quarantined: Dr Spencer contracted the disease after treating patients in Guinea (left). His fiancee Morgan Dixon (right with Spencer) has been quarantined in their Harlem apartment until November 14

Quarantined: Dr Spencer contracted the disease after treating patients in Guinea (left). His fiancee Morgan Dixon (right with Spencer) was quarantined until recently in their Harlem apartment

However medical advice has warned him off having sex for three months because the virus can survive in semen.

Dr Spencer, pictured with his fiancée, who was also monitored for Ebola symptoms after his diagnosis

Dr Spencer, pictured with his fiancée, who was also monitored for Ebola symptoms after his diagnosis

Ebola has killed more than 4,950 people since it broke out in West Africa earlier this year, according to the World Health Organization.

The bulk of the cases and deaths have come in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea 

In North Carolina, health officials said on Monday a missionary, Dr. John Fankhauser, 52, of Ventura, California, was deemed to be at 'some risk' for developing the disease after returning from Liberia and had been placed under a 21-day quarantine.

There has been only one Ebola death in the United States - Thomas Eric Duncan, who contracted the disease in his native Liberia and died in Dallas, where he had gone to visit.

In Maine, nurse Kaci Hickox, who treated Ebola patients in West Africa and publicly fought quarantine orders in New Jersey and Maine after returning to the United States last month, planned to move from her Fort Kent home after her quarantine expired on Monday, according to local media.

On Sunday, CBS said that '60 Minutes' reporter Lara Logan and her colleagues had quarantined themselves in a hotel in South Africa after producing a report on an Ebola clinic in Liberia.

Medical experts say Ebola can be transmitted only through the bodily fluid of a person who is exhibiting symptoms.

Dr. Craig Spencer (right) and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio applaud the medical staff at Bellevue after the Doctors Without Borders volunteer was cured and left hospital on Tuesday

Dr. Craig Spencer (right) and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio applaud the medical staff at Bellevue after the Doctors Without Borders volunteer was cured and left hospital on Tuesday

THE 8 AMERICANS THAT HAVE BEEN CURED ON U.S. SOIL WITHIN 40 DAYS

Dr Kent Brantly: Contracted Ebola in Liberia, arrived in the US August 2, released August 23

Dr Nancy Writebol: Also infected in Liberia, arrived in the US August 5, released August 21

Dr Rick Sacra: Admitted to Nebraska Medical Center September 5, released September 25 

Unnamed patient: Admitted to Emory Hospital September 9, discharged October 19

Ashoka Mukpo: Admitted to Nebraska Medical Center October 6, discharged October 22

Nina Pham: Admitted to Dallas Presbyterian Hospital October 12, discharged October 24

Amber Vinson: Admitted to Dallas Presbyterian Hospital October 15, discharged October 22

Dr Craig Spencer: Admitted to Bellevue Hospital Center October 23, discharged November 11

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1st Person Diagnosed With Ebola In The U.S., Thomas Eric Duncan Dies {VIDEO} How come all the DOCTORS who caught it LIVED?

Excalibur

  • Fury erupts after health spokesman confirms pet dog has been destroyed
  • Teresa Romero Ramos's animal was put to sleep inside her home in Spain
  • House disinfected before Excalibur's body was taken away in white van
  • Demonstrators mounted a vigil outside to try to stop the move yesterday
  • 300,000 people had already signed petition urging authorities to spare dog 

A Spanish ebola victim’s pet dog was put down last night over fears it could transmit the disease, prompting outrage from animal lovers who chanted ‘murderers’ outside the woman’s home.

Fury erupted after a government health spokesman confirmed that Teresa Romero Ramos’s dog, Excalibur, had been destroyed. The official explained: ‘Unfortunately we had no other choice.’

The animal was put to sleep inside Mrs Romero Ramos’s home, which was disinfected before the animal’s body was taken away in a white van to a nearby incinerator. 

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Pet: A government health spokesman confirmed Teresa Romero Ramos's dog Excalibur has been put down

Pet: A government health spokesman confirmed Teresa Romero Ramos's dog Excalibur has been put down

Fury: A demonstrator blocking the road to stop the van transporting Excalibur is removed by a police officer, outside the housing development in which the nurse lives in Alcorcon, outside Madrid

Fury: A demonstrator blocking the road to stop the van transporting Excalibur is removed by a police officer, outside the housing development in which the nurse lives in Alcorcon, outside Madrid

Frenzied: A woman is helped after fainting following the exit of the van transporting Excalibur in Alcorcon, Spain

Frenzied: A woman is helped after fainting following the exit of the van transporting Excalibur in Alcorcon, Spain

On their way: Veterinary workers wearing protective masks drive a van containing Excalibur from an apartment building

On their way: Veterinary workers wearing protective masks drive a van containing Excalibur from an apartment building

Charging the vehicle: Demonstrators run in front of policemen and in front of the van transporting Excalibur

Charging the vehicle: Demonstrators run in front of policemen and in front of the van transporting Excalibur

Officers: A man is held by police in front of the van transporting the dog 'Excalibur', who has been put down

Officers: A man is held by police in front of the van transporting the dog 'Excalibur', who has been put down

Demonstrators who mounted a vigil outside to try to stop the move shouted ‘murderers’ and several threw themselves on the ground as the vehicle left.

Some 300,000 people had already signed a petition urging authorities to spare Excalibur.

Twitter was awash with photographs of dogs, cats and birds which were posted alongside the hashtag ‘SalvemosAExcalibur’ – Spanish for ‘Let’s save Excalibur’.

Mrs Romero Ramos, 44, from Galicia in north-west Spain, who is one of the medical team that treated two repatriated Spanish priests who died from ebola, has been in quarantine since it was confirmed she was carrying the virus. 

Gone: Ebola victim Teresa Romero Ramos with her beloved dog Excalibur, which authorities have put down

Gone: Ebola victim Teresa Romero Ramos with her beloved dog Excalibur, which authorities have put down

A woman cries after locals and members of animal rights groups clashed with police to stop the removal and euthanazia of Excalibur
Police clash with animal rights activists

Emotional: Two women cry after locals and members of animal rights groups clashed with police to stop the removal and euthanasia of Excalibur 

Outcry: Animal rights activists react as the van (bottom) carrying Excalibur, the dog of the Spanish nurse who contracted Ebola, leaves her apartment building in Alcorcon

Outcry: Animal rights activists react as the van (bottom) carrying Excalibur, the dog of the Spanish nurse who contracted Ebola, leaves her apartment building in Alcorcon

Some 50 people protest against the killing of the nurse's dog outside her home in Alcorcon, outside Madrid

Some 50 people protest against the killing of the nurse's dog outside her home in Alcorcon, outside Madrid

Animal rights activists scuffle with police as an ambulance arrives at the entrance of the apartment building of Mrs Romero Ramos

Animal rights activists scuffle with police as an ambulance arrives at the entrance of the apartment building of Mrs Romero Ramos

Spanish police block animal rights activists protesting outside the apartment building of Mrs Romero Ramos

Spanish police block animal rights activists protesting outside the apartment building of Mrs Romero Ramos

She has now admitted touching her face with her gloves as she took off a protective suit after leaving the room of one of the priests.

Today I’m better. It's slow going but I’m better 
Teresa Romero Ramos

Mrs Romero Ramos confessed her accident to a doctor after earlier insisting that she had no idea how she became infected.

Hospital chief German Ramirez said yesterday – 48 hours after the launch of a probe into how Mrs Romero Ramos caught the virus – ‘It looks like we have found the origin.’

But the speed with which he attributed the shock transmission to a ‘slip-up’ failed to silence critics who demanded that heads rolls after a string of spectacular mistakes by health co-ordinators. 

Final day of freedom: Excalibur, the dog of the Spanish nurse, barks from her balcony in Madrid, on Wednesday

Final day of freedom: Excalibur, the dog of the Spanish nurse, barks from her balcony in Madrid, on Wednesday

Leaving: A vetenary van carrying Excalibur, the dog of Ebola-infected Spanish nurse Teresa and her husband Javier Limon, as it leaves the couple's residence

Leaving: A vetenary van carrying Excalibur, the dog of Ebola-infected Spanish nurse Teresa and her husband Javier Limon, as it leaves the couple's residence

Some 50 people protest against the killing of the Spanish nurse's dog outside the Ebola infected nurse's home in Alcorcon

Some 50 people protest against the killing of the Spanish nurse's dog outside the Ebola infected nurse's home in Alcorcon

A worker wearing protective clothing stand outside the private residence of Teresa Romero Ramos on Wednesday

A worker wearing protective clothing stand outside the private residence of Teresa Romero Ramos on Wednesday

Health minister Ana Mato is facing calls for her resignation after it emerged that Mrs Romero Ramos complained of feeling unwell six days before she was eventually admitted to hospital. 

Nobody ever told me to my face, "Teresa you’ve got ebola"
Teresa Romero Ramos 

She was rushed to hospital by unprotected paramedics in a normal ambulance only taken out of service 12 hours later and found out she had ebola by reading a Spanish newspaper website as she waited to be quarantined.

Her home in Alcorcon near Madrid that she shares with husband Javier Limon Romero, one of those quarantined at Madrid’s Carlos III Hospital, was not disinfected until yesterday morning.

Six people in total have now been quarantined since the start of Monday’s crisis.

They include three other hospital nursing staff who helped treat Miguel Pajares and Manuel Garcia Viejo, the Spanish priests who died after they were repatriated from West Africa. 

Twitter is awash with photographs of dogs, cats and birds which have been posted alongside the hashtag 'SalvemosAExcalibur' – which is Spanish for 'Let's save Excalibur' - in a bid to save the Spanish 'Ebola' dog 

Twitter is awash with photographs of dogs, cats and birds which have been posted alongside the hashtag 'SalvemosAExcalibur' – which is Spanish for 'Let's save Excalibur' - in a bid to save the Spanish 'Ebola' dog 

Twitter users have been desperately posting photos of their own animals as part of a campaign to save the dog

Twitter users have been desperately posting photos of their own animals as part of a campaign to save the dog

The adorable photos of the pets is part of the attempt to save Excalibur - the dog threatened with death

One Twitter user even took a photograph of his pet bird for the campaign, which has been trending on Twitter

The adorable photos of the pets is part of the attempt to save Excalibur - the dog threatened with death

The adorable photos of the pets is part of the attempt to save Excalibur - the dog threatened with death

As well as posting photographs of dogs, some users put pictures of their cats on the social media site

As well as posting photographs of dogs, some users put pictures of their cats on the social media site

Mrs Romero Ramos was reportedly feeling better after being treated with antibodies from an ebola survivor. She told a Spanish TV station by phone: ‘Today I’m better. It’s slow going but I’m better.’

Revealing how she discovered she was infected, she said: ‘Nobody told me anything.

‘I suspected something because at the beginning the nurses and doctors came in every hour, then they stopped coming in and I thought that something was up.

‘I got hold of my mobile and that’s when I saw on the website of El Pais newspaper that I had tested positive for ebola twice. Nobody ever told me to my face, “Teresa you’ve got ebola”.’

She went on to say that she had been given only 20 minutes’ training in how to put on and take off her protective suit.

Javier Limon Romero (pictured with Excalibur) had called for the dog to be saved and even tried to get ownership of his beloved bed temporarily passed over to a friend and veterinary nurse while he is in quarantine

Javier Limon Romero (pictured with Excalibur) had called for the dog to be saved and even tried to get ownership of his beloved bed temporarily passed over to a friend and veterinary nurse while he is in quarantine

Mixed-breed Excalibur had been scheduled to be put down after Spanish authorities got a court order to do so

Mixed-breed Excalibur had been scheduled to be put down after Spanish authorities got a court order to do so

Husband of Spanish Ebola nurse pleads to save dog

Save Excalibur! The photos of pets 'asking' for the Spanish dog to be saved kept on coming overnight

Save Excalibur! The photos of pets 'asking' for the Spanish dog to be saved kept on coming overnight

Twitter users made their photographs look as though it was their pets who were calling for the dog to be saved

Twitter users made their photographs look as though it was their pets who were calling for the dog to be saved

Some even digitally edited the photograph to include the SalvemosAExcalibur hashtag which started trending

Some even digitally edited the photograph to include the SalvemosAExcalibur hashtag which started trending

As part of the campaign, thousands of people started sharing and tweeting this poster in a bid to save the dog

As part of the campaign, thousands of people started sharing and tweeting this poster in a bid to save the dog

Officers with handguns stood outside the house of Teresa Romero Ramos in the suburb of Alcorcon yesterday

Officers with handguns stood outside the house of Teresa Romero Ramos in the suburb of Alcorcon yesterday

Police stood guard outside the residence of Mrs Ramos, the Spanish nurse infected with the deadly Ebola virus

Police stood guard outside the residence of Mrs Ramos, the Spanish nurse infected with the deadly Ebola virus

Ebola in Spain: Hospital staff stage demo, 4 under observation


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VIDEO} Incredible moment 'dead' Ebola victim left in the street for days in Liberia turns out to be ALIVE as he is prepared for burial

The first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States died Wednesday morning in a Dallas hospital, according to a hospital spokesman.

Thomas Eric Duncan was pronounced dead at 7:51 a.m. at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where he was admitted Sept. 28 and has been kept in isolation, according to spokesman Wendell Watson.

Thomas Eric Duncan

Duncan carried the deadly virus with him from his home in Liberia, though he showed no signs when he left for the United States. He arrived in Dallas Sept. 20 and fell sick a few days later. His condition was downgraded during the weekend from serious to critical.

Others in Dallas still are being monitored as health officials try to contain the virus that has ravaged West Africa, with more than 3,400 people reported dead. They also are trying to tamp down anxiety among residents frightened of contracting Ebola, though the disease can be spread only through direct contact with the bodily fluids of an already sick person.

Health officials have identified 10 people, including seven health workers, who had direct contact with Duncan while he was contagious. Another 38 people also may have come into contact with him.

The four people living in the northeast Dallas apartment where Duncan stayed have been isolated in a private residence.

Everyone who potentially had contact with Duncan will be monitored for 21 days, the normal incubation period for the disease.

Duncan passed an airport health screening in Liberia, where doctors measured his temperature as normal and found no signs of Ebola symptoms. But a few days after he arrived, he began to have a fever, headache and abdominal pain.

He went to the emergency room of Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas on Sept. 24, but was sent home. By Sept. 27, his condition had worsened. An ambulance that day took him back to the hospital, where he stayed in isolation.

The hospital has changed its explanation several times about when Duncan arrived and what he said about his travel history. It has acknowledged that Duncan told them on his first visit that he came from West Africa.

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'They dropped the ball': U.S. hospital admits 'flaw' Ebola victim was sent home with painkillers and remained at large for a WEEK

  • Unnamed 37-year-old had been left dying on a Monrovia street for days
  • Locals tried to get man medical care but health workers refused to treat him 
  • When man eventually stopped moving it was assumed he had passed away
  • Funeral workers were called to collect body but noticed he was still moving
  • Realisation prompted cheers from onlookers who then demanded he be taken to hospital for the treatment he so desperately required

A man thought to have died of Ebola in the middle of a Liberian street was discovered to still be alive when funeral workers arrived to pick up his body.

The unnamed 37-year-old is said to have been dying from the virus in the open air for several days but ambulance workers in the capital Monrovia refused to treat him, local community leaders said.

Finally, following days without medical attention, the man stopped moving and funeral workers were called - although while preparing to take him for burial they noticed he was trying to move his arms.

The realistion that the man was still alive prompted cheers from the large crowd of onlookers, who then had to plead with paramedics to take the man for treatment at the hospital.

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Care: Thinking the man (pictured background, beneath blanket) had already died, ABC News reporter Dr Richard Besser was filming a piece to camera about the way the victim had not been given medical attention

Care: Thinking the man (pictured background, beneath blanket) had already died, ABC News reporter Dr Richard Besser was filming a piece to camera about the way the victim had not been given medical attention

'He's alive': A burial team arrived and began spraying the unnamed man - who had been covered by a blanket - with bleach. As they put hid 'body' on a stretcher, one worker noticed the man was moving his arms

'He's alive': A burial team arrived and began spraying the unnamed man - who had been covered by a blanket - with bleach. As they put hid 'body' on a stretcher, one worker noticed the man was moving his arms

Not dead: Although incredibly weak, the man could clearly be seen moving his arms to indicate he was still alive

Not dead: Although incredibly weak, the man could clearly be seen moving his arms to indicate he was still alive

Joy: The realistion that the man was still alive prompted cheers from the large crowd of onlookers, who then had to plead with paramedics to take the man for treatment at the hospital

Joy: The realistion that the man was still alive prompted cheers from the large crowd of onlookers, who then had to plead with paramedics to take the man for treatment at the hospital

The incident occurred earlier this week in an Ebola-ravaged section of the Liberian capital Monrovia and was captured on video by ABC News.

Thinking the man had already died, reporter Dr Richard Besser was filming a piece to camera, having spoken to several community leaders about the way the victim had been abandoned without medical treatment for several days.

While the item was being recorded, a burial team arrived and began spraying the man - who had been covered by a blanket - with disinfectant and bleach.

Minutes later, as they started lifting him onto a stretcher to be placed in a mortuary vehicle, one of the funeral workers noticed he was still moving and a cry of 'He's alive' rang out.

A large crowd of onlookers then broke into cheers and applause, although the realisation initially had little impact other than the burial team dumping the critically ill man back on the floor and driving off.

An ambulance was called and this time arrived within 10 minutes, with locals pleading with paramedics to ensure the man was transported to a hospital in the hope he could be saved.

He's alive! Moment 'dead' Ebola victim nearly sent to crematorium
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Dying: The realisation that the man was still alive initially had little impact other than to convince the burial team to take the critically ill man off their stretcher and dump him back on the street

Dying: The realisation that the man was still alive initially had little impact other than to convince the burial team to take the critically ill man off their stretcher and dump him back on the street

Reluctant: An ambulance arrived within 10 minutes, but locals had to plead with paramedics through the vehicle's window to ensure the man was finally transported to a hospital

Reluctant: An ambulance arrived within 10 minutes, but locals had to plead with paramedics through the vehicle's window to ensure the man was finally transported to a hospital

At last: Ambulance workers eventually put the critically ill man on a stretcher and took him to hospital

At last: Ambulance workers eventually put the critically ill man on a stretcher and took him to hospital

Hope: The reason it was difficult to get the dying man the medical care he so desperately needed is due to a chronic shortage of hospital beds for Ebola victims in the virus-ravaged Liberian capital Monrovia

Hope: The reason it was difficult to get the dying man the medical care he so desperately needed is due to a chronic shortage of hospital beds for Ebola victims in the virus-ravaged Liberian capital Monrovia

The sick man's current state of health is not known, but Dr Besser said he appeared so ill that it seems unlikely he would have been able to cling on to life for much longer than a few more hours.

He said the reason it had proven so difficult to get him the medical care he so desperately needed is due to a chronic shortage of hospital beds for Ebola victims in virus-ravaged Monrovia.

On the other hand, there is still plenty of space at Liberia's cemeteries and crematoriums, which is why the burial team were more than happy to pick up what they thought was the man's corpse within a hour of him being reported dead. 

The news comes as an American woman was confined to her Dallas apartment under armed guard after a man infected with Ebola stayed at her home

Louise Troh said Thursday that she is tired of being locked up and wants federal health authorities to decontaminate her home, adding that she never imagined this could happen to her so far from disease-ravaged West Africa.

Authorities say the circle of people in the U.S. possibly exposed to Ebola widened after the man - who arrived from Liberia last month - was discharged from hospital without being tested for the virus.

NBC CAMERAMAN COVERING EBOLA TESTS POSITIVE FOR VIRUS IN LIBERIA 

An American cameraman helping to cover the Ebola outbreak in Liberia for NBC News has tested positive for the virus and will be flown back to the United States for treatment.

NBC News President Deborah Turness said Thursday the rest of the NBC News crew including medical correspondent Dr. Nancy Snyderman will be flown back to the U.S. and placed in quarantine for 21 days 'in an abundance of caution.'

The freelance cameraman has been working in Liberia for three years for Vice News and other media outlets, and has been covering the Ebola epidemic. He began shooting for NBC on Tuesday. The network is withholding his name at his family's request.

He began feeling tired and achy Wednesday and discovered he had a slight fever. He went to a treatment center Thursday to be tested, and is being kept there, said Snyderman, who was interviewed Thursday night on 'The Rachel Maddow Show' on MSNBC.

Snyderman said she believes his exposure to the virus happened sometime before he started working with the NBC crew, since it is usually eight to 10 days before the first symptoms are seen.

 

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NBC cameraman diagnosed with Ebola and station's chief medical correspondent put in quarantine: News team flown back to U.S. from Liberia in new deadly virus scare

ebola

  • Thomas Eric Duncan told nurses he had recently been to Liberia
  • However their computer system meant doctors did not see the changes 
  • This meant he was let out of Texas Presbyterian only with antibiotics 
  • Was let loose in Dallas for a week, coming into contact with hundreds 
  • He is now back in quarantine in the hospital while those who were exposed to him have been sectioned in his apartment complex  
  • Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said today he wants people in quarantine to be moved to 'better living conditions' 
  • He was seen visiting the quarantined apartment late on Thursday evening  


A Dallas hospital treating the first person to diagnosed with Ebola on US soil has admitted staff did know he'd been to Africa but a 'flaw' meant he was released and only given antibiotics.

As a result, Thomas Eric Duncan was let loose in the city for a week, allowing him to come into contact with hundreds of people and potentially infect them with the deadly virus.

The patient, who is back in Texas Presbyterian in quarantine, told nurses during his first visit last week he had just returned from Liberia, according to CNN.

But even though his records were updated, a physician never knew as they could not view changes in his travel history, causing him to be sent home prematurely. 

The error led to Duncan being released, forcing people to be quarantined, including four people in the apartment where he was visiting his 'wife' Louise Troh. 

MORE


Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola on US soil, was discharged from Texas Presbyterian with only antibiotics because of a 'flaw' in the hospital's computer system

Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola on US soil, was discharged from Texas Presbyterian with only antibiotics because of a 'flaw' in the hospital's computer system

The glitch in the system meant that even though nurses at the hospital (pictured) knew Duncan had been to Liberia, doctors did not because the travel history does not update 

The glitch in the system meant that even though nurses at the hospital (pictured) knew Duncan had been to Liberia, doctors did not because the travel history does not update 

Liberian nurses carry a dead body suspected of dying from the Ebola virus at the Roberts field highway on the outskirts of Monrovia last week. The country has been blighted with the deadly virus since last year which has spread through West Africa, killing close to 4,000 people

Liberian nurses carry a dead body suspected of dying from the Ebola virus at the Roberts field highway on the outskirts of Monrovia last week. The country has been blighted with the deadly virus since last year which has spread through West Africa, killing close to 4,000 people

'How did this happen?' Concerned brother of Ebola victim speaks

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said: 'It was a mistake. They dropped the ball, You don't want to pile on them, but hopefully this will never happen again. The CDC has been vigorously emphasizing the need for a travel history.'

Following the error, staff at the hospital have now said they have changed the system so nurses and doctors can see travel records.

A spokesman told the station: 'We feel that this change will improve the early identification of patients who may be at risk for communicable diseases, including Ebola.' 

Duncan told his stepdaughter, Youngor Jallah, he felt weak and cold after returning from the hospital, so she went to Walmart and bought a white cotton blanket - that's when she released the situation was dire.

She told the Washington Post: 'I've been seeing Ebola on TV, how it starts, with muscle pain, red eyes. When I see his eye it is all red, and I think maybe this time it is Ebola virus and I should be careful.

An unidentified man opens the door to the apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan was staying. Two women and Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins greet him at the entrance 

An unidentified man opens the door to the apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan was staying. Two women and Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins greet him at the entrance 

Jenkins, seen leaving the Dallas apartment block on Thursday evening, has been under fire for letting a blanket Duncan was wearing back into the apartment 

Jenkins, seen leaving the Dallas apartment block on Thursday evening, has been under fire for letting a blanket Duncan was wearing back into the apartment 

Armed guards wait outside The Ivy Apartments, waiting for Judge Jenkins and the visiting party to return 

Armed guards wait outside The Ivy Apartments, waiting for Judge Jenkins and the visiting party to return 

She is being quarantined with her family in a nearby apartment. Jallah added that when she took his temperature it was 102 degrees, prompting her to call an ambulance.

Having been to the hospital once before, Duncan resisted, but paramedics arrived 15 minutes later saying they could only enter with face masks and gloves. 

After leaving Duncan at the hospital, where he was put into isolation, they returned home. However they were not put into quarantine for another three days. 

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins, in charge of local homeland security, was seen visiting the apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan was staying late on Thursday evening.

He went to the door along with two other women to greet a man inside. He is believed to be part of a group of four who have been quarantined.  

He sold in a press conference earlier on Thursday that he believes the four people quarantined inside that apartment should be moved to 'better living conditions'. 

'We are working on that. I would like to move them five minutes ago' he said. 

'We have some hygiene issues that we are addressing in that apartment. Those people in the apartment are part of Dallas County, and they're going to be treated with utmost respect and dignity in this unusual situation.

'We are working to get the response, which has been a good response, strengthened every hour of the day,' the judge said.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins, who is in charge of local homeland security, believes the four people quarantined inside Duncan's apartment should not be there at all 

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins, who is in charge of local homeland security, believes the four people quarantined inside Duncan's apartment should not be there at all 

Records: A copy of a passenger health screening form filled out by Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan is seen here

Records: A copy of a passenger health screening form filled out by Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan is seen here 

Liberia plans to prosecute Duncan who brought Ebola into the U.S., alleging that he lied on an airport questionnaire about not having any contact with an infected person, authorities said on Thursday.

Thomas Eric Duncan filled out a series of questions about his health and activities before leaving on his journey to Dallas, Texas on September 19. On the form he answered no to every question.

Among other questions, the form asked whether Duncan had cared for an Ebola patient or touched the body of anyone who had died in an area affected by Ebola.

'We expect people to do the honorable thing,' said Binyah Kesselly, chairman of the board of directors of the Liberia Airport Authority in Monrovia. The agency obtained permission from the Ministry of Justice to pursue the matter.

Neighbors in the Liberian capital believe Duncan become infected when he helped bundle a sick pregnant neighbor into a taxi a few weeks ago and set off with her to find treatment.

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf told CBC today that she was 'very angry' that Mr Duncan had left Liberia after being exposed to Ebola and that his actions were 'unpardonable'.  

She said that she hoped no one else would be infected with the virus in the U.S. 

United Airlines, which on Wednesday revealed Duncan had flown on its flights from Brussels to Washington Dulles and then from Dulles to Dallas, said it had given a 'thorough cleaning' to both planes he was on.

Despite Duncan spreading Ebola to the United States, a U.N. spokesman believes air travel to and from the West African countries affected by the Ebola virus should continue. 

Meanwhile, a leading member of the Liberian community in Dallas told MailOnline that Duncan should never have gotten on the plane to the U.S. having been in recent contact with an Ebola patient.

Roslyn Seyon said: 'If those reports are true...I don't think it was a good idea to get on that plane.

'Every person has their own conscience.

'If I was in that position I don't know what I would do. My own judgement would be not (to travel) but that's just me.

'I think about others, that's what we call selflessness and if I was in Liberia and got infected I would consider being checked and not trying to infect others.'

Miss Seyon, Vice President of the Liberian Community Association of Dallas-Fort Worth, added that she hoped Ebola was contained quickly in the U.S.

Residents reaction on possible exposure to Ebola patient
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Questioned: Passengers are questioned about their contact with Ebola patients before they are allowed to leave the country. Duncan is accused of lying on his questionnaire

Questioned: Passengers are questioned about their contact with Ebola patients before they are allowed to leave the country. Duncan is accused of lying on his questionnaire

Stephane Dujarric told reporters Thursday that 'it's very important not to isolate these countries' as it would worsen their political and economic situations. He says aid groups need access to the region. 

In Texas, health officials have reached out to about 100 people who may have had direct contact with the man who brought Ebola into the U.S. or someone close to him, a public-health spokeswoman said Thursday.

None of the people are showing symptoms, but health authorities have educated them about Ebola and told them to notify medical workers if they begin to feel ill.

The group will be monitored to see if anyone seeks medical care during the three weeks immediately following the time of contact, said Erikka Neroes, of the Dallas County Health and Human Services agency.

Ebola symptoms can include fever, muscle pain, vomiting and bleeding, and can appear as long as 21 days after exposure to the virus. The disease is not contagious until symptoms begin. It spreads only by close contact with an infected person's bodily fluids.

The 80 people include 12 to 18 who came in direct contact with the infected man, as well as others known to have had contact with them, she said.

'This is a big spider web' of people involved, Neroes said.

Teams of cleaning crews have been scrubbing four Dallas schools attended by children who came in direct contact with Mr Duncan while he was contagious with Ebola. Parents have been pulling their kids out of classes as a precaution

Teams of cleaning crews have been scrubbing four Dallas schools attended by children who came in direct contact with Mr Duncan while he was contagious with Ebola. Parents have been pulling their kids out of classes as a precaution

The initial group includes three members of the ambulance crew that took Duncan to the hospital, plus a handful of schoolchildren.

Health officials are focusing on containment to try to stem the possibility of the Ebola virus spreading beyond Duncan, who arrived in Dallas on Sept. 20 to visit relatives and fell ill a few days later.

His sister, Mai Wureh, identified Duncan as the infected man.

A Dallas emergency room sent Duncan home last week, even though he told a nurse that he had been in disease-ravaged West Africa. The decision by Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital to release Duncan could have put others at risk of exposure to Ebola before the man went back to the ER a couple of days later when his condition worsened.

The patient explained to a nurse last Thursday that he was visiting the U.S. from Africa, but that information was not widely shared, said Dr. Mark Lester, who works for the hospital's parent company.

Hospital epidemiologist Dr. Edward Goodman said the patient had a fever and abdominal pain during his first ER visit, not the riskier symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea. Duncan was diagnosed with a low-risk infection and sent home, Lester said.

The hospital is reviewing how the situation would have been handled if all staff had been aware of the man's circumstances.

But the diagnosis, and the hospital's slip-up, highlighted the wider threat of Ebola, even far from Africa.

'The scrutiny just needs to be higher now,' said Dr. Rade Vukmir, a spokesman for the American College of Emergency Physicians.

Duncan has been kept in isolation at the hospital since Sunday. He was listed Thursday in serious but stable condition.

Duncan's neighborhood, a collection of tin-roofed homes, has been ravaged by Ebola. So many people have fallen ill that neighbors are too frightened to comfort a nine-year-old girl who lost her mother to the disease.

The 19-year-old pregnant woman was convulsing and complaining of stomach pain, and everyone thought her problems were related to her pregnancy, in its seventh month. 

No ambulance would come for her, and the group that put her in a taxi never did find a hospital. She died, and in the following weeks, all the neighbors who helped have gotten sick or died, neighbors said.

Ebola is believed to have sickened more than 7,100 people in West Africa and killed more than 3,300, according to the World Health Organization. Liberia is one of the three countries hit hardest in the epidemic, along with Sierra Leone and Guinea.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

ebola

  • An American cameraman working for NBC News in Liberia has become the fourth U.S. citizen to contract Ebola
  • The 33-year-old unnamed journalist is being flown home for treatment
  • He was working alongside the news network's chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman 
  • She and the rest of her team are also being flown back to the U.S. and will spend the next 21 days in quarantine 
  • 'The rest of the crew, including Dr. Nancy, are being closely monitored and show no symptoms or warning signs' said a statement from NBC

NBC News' chief medical editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman is being flown back to the U.S. and will spend 21 days in quarantine after one of her cameramen was diagnosed with Ebola

A cameraman working for NBC News in Liberia has become the fourth American to contract the deadly Ebola virus.

The 33-year-old unnamed journalist is being flown privately back to the U.S. for treatment, while the network’s chief medical editor and correspondent Dr. Nancy Snyderman and the rest of her team are also returning and will be placed in quarantine for 21 days.

Neither Snyderman nor the other members of her team are currently displaying any signs of the disease, said NBC. 

The infected journalist, who hasn't been named, was only hired this week to be a second cameraman for Snyderman, who has been reporting on the continuing Eboloa outbreak in the country's capital Monrovia.

Snyderman has reported in recent days from a hospital in the city, where she witnessed a sick 17-year-old girl being brought in on a wheelbarrow by her mother.

'We are doing everything we can to get him the best care possible. He will be flown back to the United States for treatment at a medical center that is equipped to handle Ebola patients,' said NBC News President Deborah Turness said in a note to staff concerning the sick journalist. 

'The rest of the crew, including Dr. Nancy, are being closely monitored and show no symptoms or warning signs,' she added. 

'However, in an abundance of caution, we will fly them back on a private charter flight and then they will place themselves under quarantine in the United States for 21 days – which is at the most conservative end of the spectrum of medical guidance.'

Snyderman and her crew have been reporting in recent days from a hospital in Monrovia, Liberia
The U.S. Ebola outbreak stands at one case after Mr Duncan was diagnosed on Tuesday. West Africa has been blighted by the disease since last year, with close to 4,000 deaths and thousands more infected 
 

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Comment by GospelPan on October 11, 2014 at 10:04pm

Well...the way I see it, Africa is no longer a continent...it's a laboratory for testing on humans. America knew about Ebola long ago, and now when it's about to explode in Africa, guess what?  Yup, they ran out of vaccines.

By the time they create enough to send to Africa, I suspect thousands more will be dead...I hope I'm wrong.

Comment by Mervin E Yearwood on October 11, 2014 at 11:20am

Yes Luck Hall it is implied that their are using transfusion of blood from survivors.

Comment by Mervin E Yearwood on October 11, 2014 at 9:28am

007 :You have one of keys to a solution however I'm of the view that these Pharm.... company uses these nation to test their products and when their go rye it causes havoc .

These nations have vast raw resources that their do not profit from.

The local are usually not educated to advance level due to high cost of schooling The 54 nations of  Africa  should developed in the universities or private firms a reacher and development  programs for medical and other projects need for quality of life.

Comment by King-Tut on October 11, 2014 at 3:39am

Based on the history of outbreaks of deadly diseases in Africa, the continent should invest heavily in medicinal research for cures, and not wait for the rest of the world. South Africa being so financially RICH should take the lead on such tasks. Why is everyone waiting on America?

Comment by King-Tut on October 11, 2014 at 3:34am

I hope a cure can be found soon, or a new batch of whatever cured the two survivors be made available to the many victims in Africa.

Comment by Ricardo O'Connor on October 10, 2014 at 7:41pm
@Lucky Hall, stop playing devil's advocate. It was always about the E-B--O-L-A virus until your buddy conscious make it otherwise. Why don't you tell him that? Ohhhh! I forgot. It's just an opinion and intelligence. Full of it!! You are just as phony as he is.
Comment by Mervin E Yearwood on October 10, 2014 at 6:32pm

Lucy Hall you are welcme

Comment by Mervin E Yearwood on October 10, 2014 at 5:57pm

The 6 biggest myths about Ebola, debunked

Police, fire and medical services take part in a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear exercise in Hong Kong on October 27, 2009MIKE CLARKE/AFP/Getty Images

The world is currently experiencing the worst Ebola outbreak on record. It started in Guinea in December 2013 and has since spread to four other countries in West Africa. On September 30, a patient was diagnosed in the United States for the first time. Altogether, the outbreak has infected more than 6,500 people and killed about 3,000.

Unfortunately, as Ebola spreads, there has been a surprising amount of misinformation on the subject. Here are five common myths you might have heard about Ebola, debunked:

1) Myth: Ebola outbreaks are unstoppable

That's not true. In fact, every previous Ebola outbreak has been controlled and stopped. It is true, however, that the current Ebola outbreak has been much tougher to contain.

Deaths by outbreak

Ebola deaths by outbreak. (Joss Fong/Vox)

There have been 33 previous outbreaks of various Ebola viruses on record, all of which have been contained and stopped with far smaller death tolls than this one.

In previous outbreaks, health officials have successfully followed these steps to stop the disease from spreading: (1) find the patients (2) isolate the patients (3) find everyone those original patients have contacted (4) keep the patients isolated until they're no longer a threat. This approach is capable of containing an outbreak in most places around the world, including in the United States.

The massive outbreak this year in West Africa is new and unusual — and Ebola managed to spread so widely because of a combination of factors. It took several months before officials even realized that Ebola was in the region, many of those countries had impoverished health-care infrastructures, and the international response was weak and delayed. That gave the disease time to spread, making it much, much tougher to contain once people realized it was Ebola. In September, some scientists predicted that they expect the outbreak to last another 12 to 18 months.

2) Myth: Ebola is a death sentence

In fact, about half of Ebola patients survive. And good medical care may be able to improve outcomes.

brantly

American doctor Kent Brantly is arguably the most famous Ebola survivor in the US. (Jessica McGowan)

Ebola doesn't kill everyone who catches it. The current big outbreak, which is centered in West Africa, has killed roughly half of those who have contracted the disease.

The survival rate in all previous outbreaks of the Ebola virus EBOV (formerly called Zaire ebolavirus) has been about 20 percent. Those who survive can go back to good health and rejoin their communities. (And they'll be somewhat protected from that Ebola virus for at least the next ten years.)

Although there is no specific cure for Ebola, good medical care can help people survive. Treatment may include IV fluids to prevent dehydration from diarrhea and vomiting, as well as antibiotics to prevent or treat other infections in the body. (Ebola seems to have a suppressive effect on the immune system, which can make people especially susceptible to additional infections by unrelated bacteria.)

Some people have also received experimental therapies, but there isn't enough data yet to know if they're helpful.

3) Myth: Ebola patients always hemorrhage blood

     http://www.vox.com/2014/10/1/6880393/ebola-virus-outbreak-disease-m...

In fact, m

Comment by Ricardo O'Connor on October 10, 2014 at 3:40pm
@Lucky Hall, did you see my post where I responded to Anthony?
Comment by Ricardo O'Connor on October 10, 2014 at 3:34pm
If I feel the need to include The Lord so be it. It's my choice. Respect it. Besides, in time like these we need Him.

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