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I Was Born With No Womb But Now I've Given Birth To Twins Says Mother Who Feared That No Man Would Marry Her

Hayley Haynes gave birth after growing womb with hormone therapy miracle (pictured with her husband Sam)

A woman who was genetically born a man and was told she would never become a mother has given birth to twin girls.

Hayley Haynes was born without a womb, ovaries or fallopian tubes. At the age of 19, she was told by doctors she had XY chromosomes, so was genetically a man – and would never conceive.

Mrs Haynes, now 28, said she was devastated that she would never have children of her own – and told her childhood friend Sam, who later became her husband: 'No man will want me

Nine years after hearing she would never be a mother Mrs Haynes gave birth to Avery and Darcey (pictured)

Nine years after hearing she would never be a mother Mrs Haynes gave birth to Avery and Darcey (pictured)

Throughout puberty she did not have periods, and doctors later discovered she had no reproductive organs thanks to a condition called androgen insensitivity syndrome.

'When they told me I had no womb, I was so confused I felt sick. My biggest fear was never having children,' she told the Daily Mirror.

'Suddenly a huge piece of my life was missing. I felt like half a woman and was embarrassed. How I was going to tell a guy I was genetically male when I started dating?'

A ray of hope came in 2007 when a new specialist at Royal Derby Hospital found a tiny womb missed on previous scans. 'It was only a few millimetres, but it was a start,' said Mrs Haynes, from Bedford.

'He was optimistic it would grow. I still couldn't conceive naturally but I could have the option of IVF.'

The first step was a course of hormone tablets to give her the right levels of progesterone and oestrogen, which would stop her suffering osteoporosis and create an environment in which her womb could grow.

Doctors said she had  60 per cent chance of pregnancy -when tests came back positive she was ecstatic

Doctors said she had  60 per cent chance of pregnancy -when tests came back positive she was ecstatic

She said: 'Becoming a mother was the single most amazing moment of my life. When I held the babies in my arms for the first time, I was overwhelmed'

She said: 'Becoming a mother was the single most amazing moment of my life. When I held the babies in my arms for the first time, I was overwhelmed'

In 2011, Mrs Haynes was told her womb was ready for IVF – but was dealt another blow when she was told her local NHS trust would not fund it.

Determined not to give up, the couple paid £10,500 – more than half their savings – for IVF treatment and flights to a clinic in Cyprus in April.

'I was so nervous. We only had one shot and couldn't afford to go through it all again,' Mrs Haynes said. 'I desperately wanted to be a mother and knew if there were no viable eggs or the implantation wasn't successful, I'd be distraught.'

Doctors told her she had only a 60 per cent chance of pregnancy – so when two tests came back positive, she was ecstatic.

And when Mrs Haynes went for her six-week scan, it was a shock to discover both eggs had taken and she was expecting non-identical twins. 'I couldn't believe it', she said. 'I freaked out, but I was over the moon at the same time. I had the chance to have a complete family.'

Mr Haynes, also 28, added: 'I felt numb with excitement. It was two for the price of one.'

Nine years after hearing the crushing news that she would never be a mother, Mrs Haynes gave birth to Avery and Darcey.

She said: 'Becoming a mother was the single most amazing moment of my life. When I held the babies in my arms for the first time, I was overwhelmed.' 

Proud father Sam Haynes with the couple's beautiful baby twins Avery and Darcey 

Proud father Sam Haynes with the couple's beautiful baby twins Avery and Darcey 

The couple paid £10,500 – more than half their savings – for IVF treatment and flights to a clinic in Cyprus

The couple paid £10,500 – more than half their savings – for IVF treatment and flights to a clinic in Cyprus

WHAT IS ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY SYNDROME? 

Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) affects the normal development of a child's genitals and reproductive organs.

A child born with AIS is genetically male, but their genitals may appear to be female or somewhere between male and female.

AIS is a very rare condition thought to occur in around 1 in 20,000 births.

 

In early stage pregnancy, all unborn babies have identical genitals, regardless of their gender.

As a baby grows inside the womb, they develop either male or female genitals, depending on which pair of sex chromosomes they receive from their parents: XX or XY.

Sex chromosomes are a pair of DNA molecules (X or Y) that play a vital role in a baby's sexual development. Females usually have two X chromosomes, and males usually have one X and one Y chromosome.

The presence of a Y chromosome is important for the development of testes and prevents ovaries developing. If there's no Y chromosome, the female reproductive system and genitals will develop.

The testes produce male hormones called androgens, which usually cause male sex organs, such as the penis, to develop.

 

However, when a person has AIS, the body ignores the androgen or is insensitive to it. Genitals then develop along female lines, and the testes usually remain inside the body.

There are two types of AIS, which are determined by the level of insensitivity to androgen. They are:

1. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) – when there is total insensitivity to androgen and a child develops external genitals that are entirely female; most children born with CAIS are raised as girls

2. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) – where there is some sensitivity to androgen; the level of sensitivity will determine how the genitals develop

 

Depending on a person's level of insensitivity to androgen, they may look almost entirely male, entirely female, or have both male and female characteristics.

Children with PAIS can be brought up either as girls or boys; this is dependent on investigations and discussions carried out with the specialist team after their birth.

PAIS is usually diagnosed at birth because the genitals appear different.

Diagnosing CAIS can be more difficult because female genitalia usually looks normal.

Many children with CAIS are diagnosed early in life, when their testes cause hernias. The testes are discovered when the hernias are operated on.

In other cases, CAIS may not be diagnosed until puberty, when a girl's periods don't start and she has a lack of pubic and underarm hair. Breast development tends to be normal 



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Comment by MC SMILEY on February 6, 2015 at 1:25pm

THANK GOD

Comment by Cee Gee on February 3, 2015 at 10:09am

Happy for her!

Comment by Big Woman on February 1, 2015 at 3:30am
God bless this new family!
Comment by Amanda G on January 31, 2015 at 8:18pm
So beautiful
Comment by Roots aka TJ What De Ras on January 31, 2015 at 6:16pm
Amen
Comment by vaughn mitchell on January 31, 2015 at 6:03pm

wow

Comment by DaRadiant1 on January 31, 2015 at 4:42pm
Typo:A is and Stem Cells
Comment by DaRadiant1 on January 31, 2015 at 4:41pm
No not really. I found out about three years ago, that in a women that not only the liver can grow back but well as tonsils and ovaries and fallopian tubes actually can regenerate back into the body. Yeah, I know you said bullshit, I was just like you when I found out. Anyway, the reason for regeneration because of stem cells. Yes, stem cells! So her having to conceive by her having a IS and Stem Cells, he'll yeah I believe her!. When I had my surgery when I had cancer, they took out everything, . That surgery was in June 2001. How about in November 2010, my OB/GYN doctor found an ovarian cysts with a tube attached. I got both medical reports and pictures to back up my claim. So yes, she can do have the kids. Also, a baby can survive outside the uterus, but it would be a risky pregnancy. All that baby needs is an organ and a blood supply from that organ. You will he amazed what the human body can do. So this article just proved to us or me that God don't make no mistakes.
Comment by The Future on January 31, 2015 at 2:22pm
Straight BS........

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