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PICTURE EXCLUSIVE: Moment Ebola victim arrived in Dallas and greeted smiling relative after flight from Liberia - bringing deadly virus to American soil {F}

U.S. Ebola Patient May Have Been Exposed To 80 People. 2nd Possible Case In Texas & 1 In Hawaii Being Monitored (VIDEO)

ebola

  • Thomas Eric Duncan, 42, is pictured arriving at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport 
  • Holds a relative wearing traditional African dress while on the phone
  • Is notifying his family members that he will be at their Dallas home shortly 
  • Was able to make the journey after allegedly lying on health forms in Liberia 
  • He is in a critical condition in hospital and is being held in isolation  
  • Texas authorities are still searching for people who may have been exposed
  • Scare cases sweeping the nation with 100 potential patients reported today 

Standing in the arrivals lounge of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport this is the moment Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan unwittingly brought the deadly virus to the USA.

Pictured moments after he completed his journey from disease-ravaged Liberia, two weeks ago, the 42-year-old smiles, as he is greeted warmly by relatives.

Holding a family member close he calls others on his cell phone to tell them he will shortly be arriving at their home in Dallas.

It follows a journey he was only able to make after he allegedly lied on an airport questionnaire in Liberia about not having any contact with a person infected with the deadly disease.

Scroll down for video 

Arrival: Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan, 42 greets a woman and phones his family after landing at Dallas-Forth Worth International Airport on September 20th 

Arrival: Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan, 42 greets a woman and phones his family after landing at Dallas-Forth Worth International Airport on September 20th 

Dressed in a traditional African costume and with her hair-styled especially for the happy occasion the relative appears pleased to see him.

Looking healthy Mr Duncan shows no signs of the potentially fatal Ebola virus that struck him down just days after he arrived in the USA.

Today the 42-year-old is fighting for his life at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas after doctors confirmed his medical condition had dramatically altered from serious to critical.

Texas Health Resources, which runs the hospital, said in a statement: 'Mr Duncan is in a critical condition.'

However the relative – who MailOnline have decided not to name – appears to have initially been in denial about the risk to her health after her extended family and friends contacted her following Mr Duncan's hospital admission last week.

A friend told MailOnline: 'She is the one who went to pick Thomas Eric Duncan up from the airport.

'They greeted each other, they hugged and held each other, which is only normal. They were pleased to see each other.

'But now everyone has been asking her about what has happened.

'And she has replied; "my Daddy does not have Ebola."

'She said; "Everyone should stop calling me because my dad does not have Ebola."

Document: A photo shows a copy of a passenger health screening form filled out by Thomas Eric Duncan and handed to the Liberian Airport Authority. Officials in the country say they plan to prosecute him 

Document: A photo shows a copy of a passenger health screening form filled out by Thomas Eric Duncan and handed to the Liberian Airport Authority. Officials in the country say they plan to prosecute him 

The relative was urged to undergo medical tests to see if she had become infected by the virus. But she appeared to be reluctant to do so.

The friend told MailOnline: 'She was meant to go for a medical check-up because she was one of the people who had been with him [Thomas Duncan], but she did not.'

It is unclear whether the relative – who is in a stable relationship and has three young children – has since been to see a doctor.

Mr Duncan arrived in Texas on September 20th after passing through two of the busiest airports in the USA - at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, and Dulles International Airport in Washington DC.

The Liberian national had earlier passed through Brussels International in Belgium on a flight from the African state's capital Monrovia.

Authorities have claimed he posed no danger to his fellow travelers or anyone who later boarded those planes because he was not displacing any symptoms of the Ebola virus at the time and was therefore not contagious.

Home: After leaving the airport, the 42-year-old went to this apartment in Dallas where he stayed with four members of his family. Hazmat teams decontaminated the area a week after he was diagnosed with Ebola

Health officials issue order to Ebola patient family to stay...

However the 42-year-old helped to carry pregnant daughter of a neighbour who was dying of Ebola prior to the journey.

Mr Duncan had come to Dallas to marry the mother of his estranged son, Louise Troh, which would have paved the way for him to stay in the USA permanently, it has emerged.

Mark Wingfield, pastor at the Wilshire Baptist Church in Dallas, where Ms Troh worships, told MailOnline: 'Louise told our senior pastor on Thursday.

The 42-year-old, who is understood to have arrived in the USA on a tourist visa, met Ms Troh in Liberia many years ago, according to Wilshire Baptist church pastor George Mason.

He said: 'They had this child. They had a falling out, and she came to the [United] States.'

The child, Kasiah Duncan, also came to the USA and this week said he had not seen his father since he was aged three. He is a 19-year-old college student at Angelo State University in San Angelo.

Relocated: Two of Duncan's relatives who were quarantined inside the apartment are seen leaving and being moved to another, undisclosed location 

Relocated: Two of Duncan's relatives who were quarantined inside the apartment are seen leaving and being moved to another, undisclosed location 

Mr Mason added: 'The son hasn't really seen his father for many years.

'I think [Duncan] was seeking reconciliation and hoping they might marry.'

Ms Troh visited the Liberian capital Monrovia, where Mr Duncan was living, in August this year, according to her Facebook page.

Louise Troh's ex-husband Joe Joe Jallah, who met Mr Duncan before he was admitted to hospital, told the Wall Street Journal, that he believed this was his first trip to the USA.

Mr Duncan arrived in Texas on September 20. He began showing symptoms of Ebola three days after his arrival and was admitted to Texas Presbyterian Hospital on Sunday.

Texas health officials have said about 100 people may have come into contact with Mr Duncan.

And today they announced nine family members and health-care workers had had direct exposure to the Ebola patient and that none has had any symptoms of the disease.

Separately, five public school children who had possibly been exposed to the Ebola patient had been kept home from class in recent days while being monitored as a precaution, though none had shown any symptoms, said Mike Miles, superintendent of the Dallas Independent School District. 

Fears: Officers hand out facemasks at Newark Liberty Airport today, where it was feared a passenger had Ebola. It later turned out he did not

Fears: Officers hand out facemasks at Newark Liberty Airport today, where it was feared a passenger had Ebola. It later turned out he did not

Ebola scare cases are sweeping the nation, with more than 100 potential victims reported to authorities by hospitals in the last few days.

Health workers are on high alert for anybody with links to West Africa - where the disease has killed thousands - who show Ebola-like symptoms, which include vomiting, bleeding and diarrhea.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has been deluged by reports of potential sufferers - but so far none have turned out to be genuine Ebola victims. 

Today Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the rush of potential cases came after news of Duncan's infection spread to hospitals, who have been especially vigilant. 

The first Ebola diagnosis in the United States 'has really increased attention to what health workers need to do to be alert and make sure a travel history is taken,' Frieden told a news conference.

Quarantined: Thomas Eric Duncan is being treated in isolation in Texas Presbyterian in Dallas 

Frieden added that many of the inquiries involved people who had not traveled from West Africa, but that the agency preferred healthcare workers to cast as wide a net as possible. 

Today hazmat crews and disease control officials swooped on a plane this afternoon amid Ebola fears prompted by a Liberian man who started vomiting on a flight to Newark Liberty airport.

Passengers were held for hours as the man - thought to be 35 - and his young daughter were rushed off the plane to hospital. Doctors later confirmed that neither of them has the deadly virus.

Hospital authorities said the man, believed to be around 35, instead has an unrelated disease which is easily treatable.

His daughter, believed to be 10, was also taken to hospital amid fears she was carrying the fatal virus. But she showed no symptoms of any illness at all, doctors said. 

The governments of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia are struggling to contain the worst outbreak on record of the deadly hemorrhagic fever.

The World Health Organization on Friday updated its death toll to at least 3,439 out of 7,492 suspected, probable or confirmed cases.

Red Cross workers carry away the body of a person suspected of dying from the Ebola virus, in the Liberian capital Monrovia. The death toll in West Africa was updated to 3,439 on Friday 

Red Cross workers carry away the body of a person suspected of dying from the Ebola virus, in the Liberian capital Monrovia. The death toll in West Africa was updated to 3,439 on Friday 

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The Center For Disease Control Confirms First Ebola Case Diagnosed In The United States (VIDEO}

Thomas Eric Duncan is the first person to test positive for Ebola in the U.S.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - As many as 80 people were in contact with the Dallas Ebola patient at some point, Texas health officials told NBC, marking a significant jump from the 18 people authorities had said may have been exposed to the deadly virus.

Additionally, four members of the patient's family have been ordered to stay home as a precaution even though they are not showing symptoms, the Texas Department of State Health Services said in a statement.

The health officials said 80 people may have come into contact with Duncan, NBC reported. Earlier, they had put the figure at up to 18, including five children.

State officials delivered the order on Wednesday night to the family of the patient, who has been identified as Thomas Eric Duncan of Liberia. Family members must stay home until Oct. 19 and not have any visitors without approval, officials said.

"We have tried and true protocols to protect the public and stop the spread of this disease," said Dr. David Lakey, Texas health commissioner. "This order gives us the ability to monitor the situation in the most meticulous way."

The first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Duncan was admitted to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital on Sunday after hospital workers mistakenly sent him home days earlier.

His case has sparked concern over the potential for a wider spread of the deadly virus from West Africa, where at least 3,338 people have died in the worst outbreak on record.

(Reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Doina Chiacu)

Possible New Ebola Cases In Hawaii And Texas Being Monitored

Dallas Ebola patient was seen vomiting outside home

NIH Director On Texas Hospital's Ebola Screwup: 'We Just Need To Put That Behind Us'

Texas Officials 80 People exposed To Ebola Patient

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Jamaica denies rumours of suspected case of Ebola virus

A man at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has tested positive for the Ebola virus. It's the first case diagnosed in the United States.

The patient has been in isolation since being admitted to the hospital on September 26 with Ebola-like symptoms. He had recently returned from a trip to Liberia.

"The patient developed symptoms days after returning to Texas from West Africa and was admitted into isolation on Sunday at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas," the Texas Department of State Health Services said in a statement.

PICTURED: U.S. doctor infected with Ebola virus unsteady on his fee...

The Center for Disease Control just held a press conference at its headquarters in Atlanta.

They are stressing that the virus is difficult to catch because it's spread through bodily fluids and is not an airborne disease. CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden is confident it will not spread to other parts of the U.S.

The disease is currently ravaging West Africa. The death toll there has reached 3000 so far in 2014.

The Center For DIsease Control Estimates Ebola Cases Could Hit 1.4 Million By January {VIDEO}

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[Watch] Boy, Cured of Ebola, Does Celebratory Dance

New estimates by the World Health Organization and the U.S. health agency are warning that the number of Ebola cases could soar dramatically — the U.S. says up to 1.4 million by mid-January in two nations alone — unless efforts to curb the outbreak are significantly ramped up.

Since the first cases were reported six months ago, the tally of cases in West Africa has reached an estimated 5,800 illnesses and over 2,800 deaths. But the U.N. health agency has warned that tallies of recorded cases and deaths are likely to be gross underestimates of the toll that the killer virus is wreaking on West Africa.

The U.N. health agency said Tuesday that the true death toll for Liberia, the hardest-hit nation in the outbreak, may never be known, since many bodies of Ebola victims in a crowded slum in the capital, Monrovia, have simply been thrown into nearby rivers.

In its new analysis, WHO said Ebola cases are rising exponentially and warned the disease could sicken people for years to come without better control measures. The WHO's calculations are based on reported cases only.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, released its own predictions Tuesday for the epidemic's toll, based partly on the assumption that Ebola cases are being underreported. The report says there could be up to 21,000 reported and unreported cases in Liberia and Sierra Leone alone by the end of this month and that cases could balloon to as many as 1.4 million by mid-January.

Experts caution those predictions don't take into account response efforts.

The CDC's numbers seem "somewhat pessimistic" and do not account for infection control efforts already underway, said Dr. Richard Wenzel, a Virginia Commonwealth University scientist who formerly led the International Society for Infectious Diseases.

In recent weeks, health officials worldwide have stepped up efforts to provide aid, but the virus is still spreading. There aren't enough hospital beds, health workers or even soap and water in the hardest-hit West African countries: Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.

Last week, the U.S. announced it would build more than a dozen medical centers in Liberia and send 3,000 troops to help. Britain and France have also pledged to build treatment centers in Sierra Leone and Guinea and the World Bank and UNICEF have sent more than $1 million worth of supplies to the region.

"We're beginning to see some signs in the response that gives us hope this increase in cases won't happen," said Christopher Dye, WHO's director of strategy and co-author of the study published by the New England Journal of Medicine, who acknowledged the predictions come with a lot of uncertainties.

"This is a bit like weather forecasting. We can do it a few days in advance, but looking a few weeks or months ahead is very difficult."

WHO also calculated the death rate to be about 70 percent among hospitalized patients but noted many Ebola cases were only identified after they died. Dye said there was no proof Ebola was more infectious or deadly than in previous outbreaks.

Outside experts questioned WHO's projections and said Ebola's spread would ultimately be slowed not only by containment measures but by changes in people's behavior.

"It's a big assumption that nothing will change in the current outbreak response," said Dr. Armand Sprecher, an infectious diseases specialist at Doctors Without Borders.

"Ebola outbreaks usually end when people stop touching the sick," he said. "The outbreak is not going to end tomorrow but there are things we can do to reduce the case count."

Local health officials have launched campaigns to educate people about the symptoms of Ebola and not to touch the sick or the dead.

Sprecher was also unconvinced that Ebola could continue causing cases for years. He said diseases that persist for years usually undergo significant changes to become less deadly or transmissible.

Dye and colleagues wrote they expected the numbers of cases and deaths from Ebola to continue rising from hundreds to thousands of cases per week in the coming months — and reach 21,000 by early November. He said it was worrisome that new cases were popping up in areas that hadn't previously reported Ebola, like in parts of Guinea.

Scientists said the response to Ebola in the next few months would be crucial.

"The window for controlling this outbreak is closing," said Adam Kucharski, a research fellow in infectious disease epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

AP Medical Writer Mike Stobbe in New York and Associated Press writer Sarah DiLorenzo in Dakar, Senegal, contributed to this report.

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3rd American Infected With The Ebola Virus, Dr. Rick Sacra, Brought To The U.S. For Treatment (Video)

About two-thirds of Ebola patients don’t survive the virus, but 11-year-old Mamadee did. The organization Doctors Without Borders caught up with the boy at their Case Management Center in Liberia to tell his story. They even captured a special moment with Mamadee, recording him dance to “Kukere,” a song by Nigerian artist Iyanya. From Doctors Without Borders:

He jumps, he ducks, he steps to the side, first left, then right, then left, then right, jumps again, turns, swings his hips and shakes his arms. He doesn’t stop, and he doesn’t get tired. It is difficult to believe, but Mamadee is an Ebola-confirmed patient.

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Violent shaking and slow suffocation: American doctor who survived Ebola tells of traumatic fight with deadly disease {VIDEO}

Dr. Rick Sacra

A doctor who became infected with Ebola while working in Liberia — the third American aid worker sickened with the virus — arrived Friday at a Nebraska hospital for treatment.

Officials at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha have said Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, will be treated at the hospital's 10-bed special isolation unit on the seventh floor, the largest of four such units in the U.S.

Sacra, from the Boston area, headed to Liberia after hearing that two other missionaries were sick. He served with the North Carolina-based charity SIM. Sacra delivered babies but was not involved in the treatment of Ebola patients, so it's unclear how he became infected with the virus that has killed about 1,900 people.

Local media reported shortly after 6 a.m. that a plane carrying Sacra landed at Offutt Air Force Base, south of the Omaha suburb of Bellevue. He arrived at the hospital in an ambulance about 40 minutes later, but media were unable to see Sacra as he was hustled into the facility.

Dr. Phil Smith, medical director of the Omaha unit, said a team of 35 doctors, nurses and other medical staffers will provide Sacra with basic care, including ensuring he is hydrated and keeping his vital signs stable.

The team is discussing experimental treatments, including using blood serum from a patient who has recovered from Ebola, Smith said.

"We've been trying to collect as much information on possible treatments as we can," Smith said.

There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the disease, but about half a dozen are in development. None has been tested on humans, but an early trial of one vaccine began this week in the United States.

Much attention has focused on the unproven drug ZMapp, which was given to seven patients, two of whom died. But the limited supply is now exhausted and its developer says it will take months to make even a modest amount.

The first two American aid workers infected by Ebola — Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol — have recovered since being flown to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta for treatment.

Smith and several other doctors with the unit repeatedly said Sacra's transfer to Omaha posed no threat to the public, noting Ebola is transmitted through close contact with an infected person.

He said Sacra was in stable condition in Liberia and was able to board the plane to the U.S. under his own power.

SIM's president, Bruce Johnson, said Sacra had received excellent care in Liberia, but that the Nebraska facility has advanced monitoring equipment and can provide more treatment options.

Sacra's wife, Debbie, said at a news conference at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester that her husband was in good spirits as he boarded the plane Thursday. She said the couple had known there was a risk of Ebola infection when he left for Liberia in August.

Debbie Sacra

"I knew he needed to be with the Liberian people," she said. "He was so concerned about the children that were going to die from malaria without hospitalization and the women who had no place to go to deliver their babies by cesarean section. He's not someone who can stand back if there's a need he can take care of."

Dr. Rick Sacra flown back to U.S. from Liberia after contracting Ebola

Debbie Sacra, wife of Dr. Rick Sacra, speaks on Ebola diagnosis

Third U.S. Ebola patient flying home for treatment

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Dr. Kent Brantly To Be Released From Atlanta Hospital After Recovering From Ebola

  • Dr Kent Brantly caught Ebola in July while working in Liberia
  • In August, he and a missionary worker were flown to Emory University Hospital where they were treated with an experimental serum 
  • Both survived the disease and have since been discharged from the hospital
  • Dr Brantly has now spoken out about his battle with Ebola in an interview with NBC

The American doctor who made a miraculous recovery from a battle with Ebola has spoken out in his first sit-down interview while recovering at home with his wife and three children. 

Dr Kent Brantly was treating Ebola patients in Liberia at the end of July, during what is currently the largest outbreak of the disease ever,  when he first started showing signs of the deadly disease. 

The 33-year-old and another infected missionary worker were transported out of the country in early August for treatment at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, where both were able to beat the disease with the help  of an experimental new serum called ZMapp.

Dr Brantly sat down with NBC's Matt Lauer this week to discuss the life-threatening experience that propelled him into the national spotlight, in an interview taped in Asheville, North Carolina where he is living in seclusion with his family.  

Scroll down for video 

What it's like to fight Ebola: Dr Kent Brantly (pictured above in an interivew with NBC) caught Ebola while working in Liberia in July, but made a miraculous recovery and has since been discharged from the hospital

What it's like to fight Ebola: Dr Kent Brantly (pictured above in an interivew with NBC) caught Ebola while working in Liberia in July, but made a miraculous recovery and has since been discharged from the hospital

The physician says he first started feeling symptoms of the disease at the end of July,  when he came down with a low fever that made him feel 'a little off - a little warm, a little under the weather'. 

At first, he hoped it was malaria or dengue fever, but the results kept coming back negative until he was eventually tested for Ebola. The positive test means death for more than 90 per cent who catch the disease, but Dr Brantly says he never lost faith even when doctors started to fear he wouldn't make it through the night. 

The disease quickly took hold in Liberia, when he started struggling to breathe and his body was overcome with shaking and violent shivers. 

'And I said to the nurse who was taking care of me, "I'm sick. I have no reserve. And I don't know how long I can keep this up." And I said, "I don't know how you're going to breathe for me when I quit breathing." 

Hope: Dr Brantly was flown out of Liberia at the beginning of August, for treatment at Emory University Hospital. Pictured above walking out of an ambulance outside the Atlanta, Georgia hospital 

Hope: Dr Brantly was flown out of Liberia at the beginning of August, for treatment at Emory University Hospital. Pictured above walking out of an ambulance outside the Atlanta, Georgia hospital 

'Cause that was the reality. I thought, "I-- I'm not gonna be able to continue breathing this way." And they had no way to breathe for me if I had to quit breathing,' Dr Brantly recalled.

Hope finally arrived early last month, when Dr Brantly and fellow missionary worker Nancy Writebol, 59, were flown out of Liberia for treatment at Emory.

The two Americans were the first to receive ZMapp which helped them fight off the disease.

Within just a few weeks, both were discharged from the hospital after testing negative for Ebola in their blood.

Ebola free: Dr Brantly was one of the first to receive an experimental serum called ZMapp which helped him fight off the disease. He is pictured above being discharged from the hospital on August 21, holding his wife Amber's hand

Ebola free: Dr Brantly was one of the first to receive an experimental serum called ZMapp which helped him fight off the disease. He is pictured above being discharged from the hospital on August 21, holding his wife Amber's hand

Victory: Over ninety per cent of those who catch Ebola die from the deadly disease. Above, Dr Brantly high-fives the medical staff who treated him at Emory as he was discharged last month

Victory: Over ninety per cent of those who catch Ebola die from the deadly disease. Above, Dr Brantly high-fives the medical staff who treated him at Emory as he was discharged last month

Dr Brantly's mind is still very much on the outbreak after news broke Wednesday that yet another American doctor has caught Ebola. Dr Brantly worked with the latest victim at the same hospital in Liberia, and told Lauer that he spent most of the morning praying for his friend. The doctor has not yet been named publicly.

Now that he is Ebola-free, Dr Brantly looks back and says he was most lucky his wife and children weren't in the country when he started showing symptoms. His family left the country a few days before to attend a wedding in Texas.

'I was so thankful that Amber and the kids were not there. Yeah, I wanted to be close to them. But that gave me great relief, knowing they were gone three days before I had any symptoms,' he said. 

'That would have been an overwhelming mental burden, if I had woken up sick next to my wife with one of my kids snuggled up next to me.'

In the interview, Dr Brantly looked thin and pale but appeared to be healthy and energized. 

'Right now I still have a lot of recovering to do,' he said. 'I know I look well but I am still pretty weak.'

Long road: Dr Brantly looked thin and pale, but otherwise healthy in his NBC interview. He says he still has a lot of recovering to do

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Calls for tighter security amid worst ever Ebola outbreak

At least one of the two American aid workers who were infected with the Ebola virus in Africa was to be discharged Thursday from an Atlanta hospital, a spokeswoman for the aid group he was working for said.

Meanwhile, Emory University Hospital planned to hold a news conference Thursday morning to discuss both patients' discharge.

Alison Geist, a spokeswoman for Samaritan's Purse, told The Associated Press she did not know the exact time Dr. Kent Brantly would be released but confirmed it would happen Thursday.

Meanwhile, Franklin Graham, president of Samaritan's Purse, said in a statement that Brantly has recovered.

"Today I join all of our Samaritan's Purse team around the world in giving thanks to God as we celebrate Dr. Kent Brantly's recovery from Ebola and release from the hospital," Graham's statement said.

Brantly and Nancy Writebol were flown out of the west African nation of Liberia earlier this month and have been getting treatment for the deadly disease in an isolation unit at the hospital. The two were infected while working at a missionary clinic outside Liberia's capital.

The Ebola outbreak has killed 1,350 people and counting across West Africa.

On Wednesday in Liberia, slum residents clashed with riot police and soldiers who used scrap wood and barbed wire to seal off 50,000 people inside the slum in an effort to contain the outbreak.

The World Health Organization said the death toll is rising most quickly in Liberia, which now accounts for at least 576 of the fatalities. At least 2,473 people have been sickened across West Africa, which is now more than the caseloads of all the previous two-dozen Ebola outbreaks combined.

Ebola is only spread through direct contact with the bodily fluids of sick people experiencing symptoms.

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Caribbean exposure to the deadly Ebola virus “low” – CARPHAEbola Biohazard virus danger sign with reflect and shadow on white background.

As the Ebola death toll jumps over the 1,200 mark, making it the deadliest outbreak since the virus was identified in 1976, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for exit screenings on all travellers from affected countries.

The international health watchdog wants checks implemented at airports, sea ports and major land crossings.

Many airlines have already suspended flights to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the countries worst affected by the killer disease which has no known cure.

Cameroon has reportedly closed its land, sea and air borders with Nigeria, which also has several cases of Ebola since the virus was imported by air from Liberia.

Meanwhile, security has been stepped up at health centres treating Ebola patients in Liberia, where a health facility in the capital Monrovia was looted and vandalised.

According to Assistant Health Minister Tolbert Nyenswah, protesters in the West Point district attacked the quarantine centre because they were upset that patients were being taken there from elsewhere in Monrovia.

Conflicting reports suggested that the protesters had considered Ebola a hoax and intended to force the closure of the facility.

The attack on the quarantine centre, described by Information Minister Lewis Brown as Liberia’s “greatest setback” since the Ebola outbreak began, was followed by further conflicting reports on the whereabouts of 17 of 34 suspected Ebola patients at the facility at the time of the incident. Claims that the 17 were missing after the attack were subsequently refuted.

Meanwhile, the UN’s chief co-ordinator in Sierra Leone, David McLachlan-Karr, says that Ebola has spread to 12 out of 13 of the country’s districts.

“While Sierra Leone was the last affected of the three Mano River countries to have confirmed [cases] of Ebola, now it’s the country with the most cases,” he was quoted as saying in a BBC report.

According to WHO, there have been at least 810 cases of Ebola reported in Sierra Leone.

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Passenger flagged as suspected Ebola carrier causes major scare at Trinidad airportEbola virus illustration with a map and microscope

EBOLA VIRUS DISEASE (EVD), FORMERLY KNOWN AS EBOLA HAEMORRHAGIC FEVER, IS A SEVERE, OFTEN FATAL ILLNESS IN HUMANS.

The Trinidad-based Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) says the risk of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) being imported to the Caribbean is low.

“There have been no confirmed cases of Ebola in the Caribbean, and overall, the risk of becoming infected with the Ebola virus in this region remains low,” said CARPHA executive director, Dr. C. James Hospedales.

He said that in countries where the virus is present, “people who have direct contact with the organs, blood, or other bodily fluids of dead or living infected persons or animals are those at greatest risk”.

“Ebola spreads through mucous and other body fluids or secretions such as stool, urine, saliva and semen of infected people.

“In the unlikely event of a person infected with Ebola travelling to the Caribbean, the available evidence shows that the risk of secondary transmission to direct close contacts (family or relatives) or in healthcare settings is still considered very low, if appropriate prevention measures are implemented.

“The risk from casual contact, such as shaking hands or sitting next to someone who is not displaying symptoms is also likely to be very low,” he added.

Key facts (Source: WHO)

  • Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever, is a severe, often fatal illness in humans.
  • EVD outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%.
  • EVD outbreaks occur primarily in remote villages in Central and West Africa, near tropical rainforests.
  • The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission.
  • Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus.
  • Severely ill patients require intensive supportive care. No licensed specific treatment or vaccine is available for use in people or animals.

CARPHA said it had evaluated the risk of importation of the disease to the Caribbean following an increase in the number of cases of EVD in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The World Health Organization (WHO), which began a two-day meeting in Geneva on Wednesday, said that since August 4, there have been 1,711 confirmed cases of EVD and 932 deaths in the four African countries, namely, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

CARPHA said that once basic precautions are followed, the risk of infection is considered to be “very low” for tourists, visitors or residents in the affected areas.

It said that these precautions include avoiding physical contact with patients showing symptoms or dead bodies and their bodily fluids, as well as avoiding unprotected sexual contact with a patient that has recently recovered from the disease.

“As with any other imported disease, Ebola virus is causing a lot of concern in the region. In this regard, CARPHA is committed to supporting its member states to adequately prepare for potential cases and to implement the necessary steps to protect healthcare facilities, patients, healthcare workers and communities,” CARPHA added.

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Flights to Sierra Leone and Liberia suspended amid escalating Ebola fears

Man Exhibiting Ebola Symptoms Being Tested At NYC Hospital. He Recently Returned From Trip To West Africa [VIDEO]

  • Relatives of Ebola victims are dragging their bodies onto streets of Liberia
  • Disease-ridden bodies are left to rot in view of everyone, including children
  • In doing so, relatives hope they will avoid being quarantined by authorities
  • They view Ebola isolation wards in country as death traps, officials claim
  • Last week, Liberia announced raft of tough measures to contain the virus
  • Include imposing quarantines on victims' homes and tracking their relatives
  • Ebola has claimed the lives of nearly 900 people across West Africa so far

A young man lies dead in the streets of Liberia, left to rot in view of passers-by and local children.

He is just one of many Ebola victims to have been dragged out of their homes and dumped on the country's roads by terrified relatives in a desperate bid to avoid being quarantined. 

The deadly virus, which can cause victims to suffer from severe bruising and bleeding from the eyes and mouth, has claimed the lives of nearly 900 people across West Africa so far. 

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

Abandoned: The body of a man who has been infected with the Ebola virus lies dead in the streets of Liberia

Abandoned: The body of a man who has been infected with the Ebola virus lies dead in the streets of Liberia

Last week, the Liberian government announced a raft of tough measures to contain the disease, including shutting schools, imposing quarantines on victim's homes and tracking their friends and relatives.

Today, Information Minister, Lewis Brown, said locals had started dragging their loved ones' bodies onto the streets out of fear that the new government regulations would risk their own health. 

 

With less than half of those infected surviving the disease, many Africans regard Ebola isolation wards as death traps, he said. 

'They are therefore removing the bodies from their homes and are putting them out in the street,' Mr Brown told Reuters. 

VIDEO: Ebola victims' bodies collected from the streets in Liberia
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Video courtesy of France24 and Katerina Vittozzi

Shocking: Relatives of Ebola victims in Liberia have started dragging their loved ones' bodies out of their homes and dumping them on the streets in a bid to avoid being quarantined. Above, a man walks past the dead body

Shocking: Relatives of Ebola victims in Liberia have started dragging their loved ones' bodies out of their homes and dumping them on the streets in a bid to avoid being quarantined. Above, a man walks past the dead body

Outbreak: Volunteers carry bodies to a van in a medical centre for Ebola patients in Kailahun, Sierra Leone

'They're exposing themselves to the risk of being contaminated. We're asking people to please leave the bodies in their homes and we'll pick them up.'

On Monday, the Liberian government announced via state radio that all corpses of Ebola victims must be cremated amid fears the incurable disease could overrun healthcare systems in one of the world's poorest regions.

The order came after a tense standoff erupted over the weekend when health workers tried to bury more than 20 Ebola victims on the outskirts of Monrovia, LIberia's ramshackle ocean-front capital.

Authorities said military police officers were called in to help restore order so that the burials could take place.

VIDEO: Second American aid worker with Ebola arrives at hospital
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Burial: Volunteers lower a corpse into the ground in Kailiahun, Sierra Leone. The body has been prepared with safe burial practices to ensure it does not pose a health risk to others and stop the transmission of Ebola

Burial: Volunteers lower a corpse into the ground in Kailiahun, Sierra Leone. The body has been prepared with safe burial practices to ensure it does not pose a health risk to others and stop the transmission of Ebola

Protection: Volunteers get changed into white bodysuits as they prepare remove the bodies of people who were suspected of contracting Ebola and died in the community in the village of Pendebu, north of Kenema

Protection: Volunteers get changed into white bodysuits as they prepare remove the bodies of people who were suspected of contracting Ebola and died in the community in the village of Pendebu, north of Kenema

Many of the victims had contracted the disease by touching the bodies of other victims as is tradition at funerals, they added.

WHAT IS THE EBOLA VIRUS?

Ebola is a severe, often fatal illness, with a death rate of up to 90 per cent. It affects humans as well as primates, including monkeys, gorillas and chimpanzees.

Once a person becomes infected, the virus can spread through contact with a sufferer's blood and other bodily fluids.

A person can also become infected if broken skin comes into contact with a victim's soiled clothing, bed linen or used needles.

Symptoms of Ebola include the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat.

These are usually followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function and internal and external bleeding.

If a person is in an area affected by the outbreak, or has been in contact with a person known or suspected to have Ebola, they should seek medical help immediately.

Mr Brown said authorities had begun cremating bodies on Sunday after local communities opposed burials in their neighbourhoods, and had carried out 12 cremations on Monday.

Meanwhile, in the border region of Lofa County, troops were deployed on Monday night to start isolating effected communities there, he said.

'We hope it will not require excessive force, but we have to do whatever we can to restrict the movement of people out of affected areas,' Mr Brown said.

The outbreak of Ebola, which emerged in March, spread to Nigeria in late July when Patrick Sawyer, a 40-year-old American of Liberian descent, flew from Liberia's capital to the megacity of Lagos

Authorities in Lagos now claim eight people who came in contact with the deceased U.S. citizen Patrick Sawyer are showing signs of the deadly disease.

In neighbouring Sierra Leone and Liberia, where the outbreak is spreading fastest, authorities have deployed troops to quarantine the border areas where 70 percent of cases have been detected.

Liberia's finance minister Amara Konneh said the country's growth forecast for the year was no longer looking realistic as a result of the outbreak. 

Stricken: It comes as a second American aid worker stricken with Ebola in West Africa has been wheeled on a stretcher in a white suit into an Atlanta hospital where doctors will try and save her and a fellow aid worker

In hospital: Nancy Writebol, pictured with children in Liberia, worked for the charity Samaritan's Purse

In hospital: Nancy Writebol, pictured with children in Liberia, worked for the charity Samaritan's Purse

Meanwhile, Sierra Leone's foreign minister Samura Kamara said that the virus had cost the government $10 million so far and was hampering efforts to stimulate growth.

Yesterday, British Airways said it was suspending flights to and from Liberia and Sierra Leone until the end of the month due to public health concerns.

Germany joined France and the United States in advising against travel to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, saying there was still no end in sight to the spread of the disease.

It comes as a second American aid worker stricken with Ebola in West Africa has been wheeled on a stretcher in a white suit into an Atlanta hospital, where doctors will try and save her and a fellow aid worker from the deadly virus. 

Eight people have Ebola symptoms in Nigeria
Paying tribute: Children lay flowers in memory of all Liberians who have died of the Ebola virus at the Women in Peace building Program (WIPNET) prayer ground in Monrovia


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • Relatives of Ebola victims are dragging their bodies onto streets of Liberia
  • Disease-ridden bodies are left to rot in view of everyone, including children
  • In doing so, relatives hope they will avoid being quarantined by authorities
  • They view Ebola isolation wards in country as death traps, officials claim
  • Last week, Liberia announced raft of tough measures to contain the virus
  • Include imposing quarantines on victims' homes and tracking their relatives
  • Ebola has claimed the lives of nearly 900 people across West Africa so far

A young man lies dead in the streets of Liberia, left to rot in view of passers-by and local children.

He is just one of many Ebola victims to have been dragged out of their homes and dumped on the country's roads by terrified relatives in a desperate bid to avoid being quarantined. 

The deadly virus, which can cause victims to suffer from severe bruising and bleeding from the eyes and mouth, has claimed the lives of nearly 900 people across West Africa so far. 

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEOS

Abandoned: The body of a man who has been infected with the Ebola virus lies dead in the streets of Liberia

Abandoned: The body of a man who has been infected with the Ebola virus lies dead in the streets of Liberia

Last week, the Liberian government announced a raft of tough measures to contain the disease, including shutting schools, imposing quarantines on victim's homes and tracking their friends and relatives.

Today, Information Minister, Lewis Brown, said locals had started dragging their loved ones' bodies onto the streets out of fear that the new government regulations would risk their own health. 

With less than half of those infected surviving the disease, many Africans regard Ebola isolation wards as death traps, he said. 

'They are therefore removing the bodies from their homes and are putting them out in the street,' Mr Brown told Reuters. 

Ebola victims' bodies collected from the streets in Liberia
Shocking: Relatives of Ebola victims in Liberia have started dragging their loved ones' bodies out of their homes and dumping them on the streets in a bid to avoid being quarantined. Above, a man walks past the dead body

Shocking: Relatives of Ebola victims in Liberia have started dragging their loved ones' bodies out of their homes and dumping them on the streets in a bid to avoid being quarantined. Above, a man walks past the dead body

Outbreak: Volunteers carry bodies to a van in a medical centre for Ebola patients in Kailahun, Sierra Leone

Outbreak: Volunteers carry bodies to a van in a medical centre for Ebola patients in Kailahun, Sierra Leone

'They're exposing themselves to the risk of being contaminated. We're asking people to please leave the bodies in their homes and we'll pick them up.'

On Monday, the Liberian government announced via state radio that all corpses of Ebola victims must be cremated amid fears the incurable disease could overrun healthcare systems in one of the world's poorest regions.

The order came after a tense standoff erupted over the weekend when health workers tried to bury more than 20 Ebola victims on the outskirts of Monrovia, LIberia's ramshackle ocean-front capital.

Authorities said military police officers were called in to help restore order so that the burials could take place.

Burial: Volunteers lower a corpse into the ground in Kailiahun, Sierra Leone. The body has been prepared with safe burial practices to ensure it does not pose a health risk to others and stop the transmission of Ebola

Protection: Volunteers get changed into white bodysuits as they prepare remove the bodies of people who were suspected of contracting Ebola and died in the community in the village of Pendebu, north of Kenema

Protection: Volunteers get changed into white bodysuits as they prepare remove the bodies of people who were suspected of contracting Ebola and died in the community in the village of Pendebu, north of Kenema

Many of the victims had contracted the disease by touching the bodies of other victims as is tradition at funerals, they added.

WHAT IS THE EBOLA VIRUS?

Ebola is a severe, often fatal illness, with a death rate of up to 90 per cent. It affects humans as well as primates, including monkeys, gorillas and chimpanzees.

Once a person becomes infected, the virus can spread through contact with a sufferer's blood and other bodily fluids.

A person can also become infected if broken skin comes into contact with a victim's soiled clothing, bed linen or used needles.

Symptoms of Ebola include the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat.

These are usually followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function and internal and external bleeding.

If a person is in an area affected by the outbreak, or has been in contact with a person known or suspected to have Ebola, they should seek medical help immediately.

Mr Brown said authorities had begun cremating bodies on Sunday after local communities opposed burials in their neighbourhoods, and had carried out 12 cremations on Monday.

Meanwhile, in the border region of Lofa County, troops were deployed on Monday night to start isolating effected communities there, he said.

'We hope it will not require excessive force, but we have to do whatever we can to restrict the movement of people out of affected areas,' Mr Brown said.

The outbreak of Ebola, which emerged in March, spread to Nigeria in late July when Patrick Sawyer, a 40-year-old American of Liberian descent, flew from Liberia's capital to the megacity of Lagos

Authorities in Lagos now claim eight people who came in contact with the deceased U.S. citizen Patrick Sawyer are showing signs of the deadly disease.

In neighbouring Sierra Leone and Liberia, where the outbreak is spreading fastest, authorities have deployed troops to quarantine the border areas where 70 percent of cases have been detected.

Liberia's finance minister Amara Konneh said the country's growth forecast for the year was no longer looking realistic as a result of the outbreak.

  
South Africa hosts emergency meeting on Ebola virus
Stricken: It comes as a second American aid worker stricken with Ebola in West Africa has been wheeled on a stretcher in a white suit into an Atlanta hospital where doctors will try and save her and a fellow aid worker

Stricken: It comes as a second American aid worker stricken with Ebola in West Africa has been wheeled on a stretcher in a white suit into an Atlanta hospital where doctors will try and save her and a fellow aid worker

In hospital: Nancy Writebol, pictured with children in Liberia, worked for the charity Samaritan's Purse

In hospital: Nancy Writebol, pictured with children in Liberia, worked for the charity Samaritan's Purse

Meanwhile, Sierra Leone's foreign minister Samura Kamara said that the virus had cost the government $10 million so far and was hampering efforts to stimulate growth.

Yesterday, British Airways said it was suspending flights to and from Liberia and Sierra Leone until the end of the month due to public health concerns.

Germany joined France and the United States in advising against travel to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, saying there was still no end in sight to the spread of the disease.

It comes as a second American aid worker stricken with Ebola in West Africa has been wheeled on a stretcher in a white suit into an Atlanta hospital, where doctors will try and save her and a fellow aid worker from the deadly virus. 

Eight people have Ebola symptoms in Nigeria

With healthcare systems in the West African nations overrun by the epidemic, the African Development Bank and World Bank said they would immediately disburse $260 million (£154million) to the three countries worst affected - Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

In Monrovia, however, some health clinics were deserted as workers and patients stayed home, afraid of catching the disease.

'The health workers think that they are not protected, they don't have the requisite material to use to protect themselves against the Ebola disease,' said Amos Richards, a physician's assistant.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

2nd U.S. Aid Workers Infected In Liberia With Ebola Being Brought To Atlanta For Treatment. CDC Says Fears Of Outbreak Are Unwarranted [Video/Pics]

A possible Ebola patient is undergoing testing today at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

The unidentified man walked into the hospital's emergency room on Monday, August 4. He had a high fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. He recently returned from a trip to West Africa where nearly 900 deaths have been reported in Nigeria, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. It's the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history.

Mount Sinai issued a statement:

"The patient has been placed in strict isolation and is undergoing medical screenings to determine the cause of his symptoms," the statement said. "All necessary steps are being taken to ensure the safety of all patients, visitors and staff. We will continue to work closely with federal, state and city health officials to address and monitor this case, keep the community informed and provide the best quality care to all of our patients."

Two American aid workers are confirmed to have the virus. Both Dr. Kent Brantly andNancy Writebol were infected at a hospital in Liberia where they were working.

Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol

Brantly is already being treated at Atlanta's Emory University Hospital. Writebol is expected to arrive Tuesday and will be admitted to the same facility.

The Ebola virus

Brantly's condition was critical before an experimental serum from the U.S. was given to him in Liberia. It had never been used on a human being before. When he arrived at Emory Hospital he was able to walk from the ambulance under his own power.

Doctor's are waiting for test results from the possible case in New York City. Those aren't expected back until tomorrow.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Nancy Writebol (center) is one of two Americans brought back to America after being infected with Ebola while in Liberia

Two U.S. aid workers who were infected with Ebola are being brought to Atlanta's Emory University Hospital for treatment. One will arrive Saturday, August 2. The second patient is expected back in the country within a few days.

Dr. Kent Brantly is on his way to Atlanta to be treated for Ebola

Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantly were with a missionary group providing care for Ebola victims at a Liberian hospital when they were infected.



Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are experiencing the worst Ebola outbreak in history. 729 people in the West African countries have died this year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned Americans to avoid nonessential travel to the region.

“This is a tragic, painful, dreadful, merciless virus. It’s the largest, most complex outbreak that we know of in history,” said CDC director Tom Frieden in a news briefing Thursday.

Writebol and Brantly will be the first people brought into the U.S. with the disease, but Frieden, told CNN there is no need for panic.

"Ebola is a virus that can be stopped," he said. "It can be stopped in the community by control measures. And it can be prevented from spread in hospitals by meticulous infection control. That means you really have to follow every one of the procedures carefully. I think we fear it because it's so unfamiliar. But we shouldn't let that unfamiliarity trump our reason about the possibility, the likelihood, availability of effective infection control in hospitals across the U.S. Ebola's a huge risk in Africa. It's not going to be a huge risk in the U.S."

How contagious is Ebola and how does it spread?

String-like Ebola virus peeling off an infected cell

Key facts

  • Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever, is a severe, often fatal illness in humans.
  • EVD outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%.
  • EVD outbreaks occur primarily in remote villages in Central and West Africa, near tropical rainforests.
  • The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission.
  • Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus.
  • Severely ill patients require intensive supportive care. No licensed specific treatment or vaccine is available for use in people or animals.

Do you think it was the right decision to bring the American Ebola patients to the U.S. for treatment?

CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta speaks with CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden about the Ebola outbreak and patients coming to U.S.

Experimental serum used on U.S. Ebola patient

CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta offers the first look inside Emory Hospital's isolation ward where Ebola patients will be treated

Views: 10655

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Comment by Bombahdrop on November 3, 2014 at 9:12am

As humans we have so many things against us that can destroy the entire world with us in it. Diseases aren't the only things we face, we also face Global warming, Asteroids, heatwaves, ice age periods, everglaze melting, Radiation from the plants near peoples home that cause unknown deformaties, cannibles running around eating people. I mean its a whole lot we face on a day to day basis. it becomes overwhelming have to be brave and strong.

Comment by Bombahdrop on November 3, 2014 at 9:07am

Dam that's really messed up, Eric Duncun lied on his health papers and brought his sick ass to United States knowing he was ill. smfh

Comment by mr1stroke on October 9, 2014 at 2:37pm

 its nothing against my african brothers and sister but they need to understand people like me cannot compromise, i have the right to say i will not deal with an african person, when they come from over there where do you think they will go, not the white community, but right in our community and that disease will pass from one to the next as plan, just like hiv, its all about depopulate and making money, they will have vaccine and than follow by a pill just like hiv they started with the cocktail now its only one pill, they really not making money with that disease because many people are able to survive with it so ebola is the new billion dollars industry for the medical community and who better to start with, two doctors had it and lived, now a third one who is a nurse is spain let see if she ill die, but i bet you not, but they had to let the black man die in order for people to get the message and have the fear of that disease so when the vaccine comes out you have no choice but to pay for it if you want to live, and watch how high health benefit will rise when that vaccine might cost them $1000 and your co pay might be between $40-to 100, and i guaranty you this will be the #1 topic for the 2016 election, republicans loss every battle against the president, back in 2012 women right and immigration was the topic, now women have the right the abort when ever and health benefit will cover it, ok they can buy birth control at any age older than 12 or 12, immigrants can live and work in the country without documents, gay rights is in about 30 states now, what the hell the republicans will talk about as we approach 2016 more and more people will die from that disease and all will be blacks, they create a disaster and trying to play God like they will rescue you, so during the election they will be discussing their plans to attack the disease so they can save people, dont ever say i lie to yall, its a way to depopulate the world so they can stay in control, and money is the only thing other than God that can save you, if you have money real money any disease can be cure or treated if can cross the border to Mexico


Comment by gazakid on October 9, 2014 at 2:33pm

sad

Comment by Elizabeth Fisher on October 5, 2014 at 6:38pm
He is wrong, all he had do was tell the truth and could have be receiving treatment
Comment by GospelPan on October 2, 2014 at 8:04pm
It always comes back to money in the end , the love of money is the root of all evil.
Comment by rashid rourk on October 2, 2014 at 7:49pm

As Ebola spreads, drug stocks surge


How to tell when investors are scared
  • 6
    TOTAL SHARES
  • 1
NEW YORK (CNNMoney)

The first confirmed Ebola case in the U.S. is fanning fears around the country, but it's also driving greed in some corners of the stock market.

Just look at the soaring stock price of drug companies scrambling to come up with a cure for the disease, which has killed more than 3,000 people in West Africa.

Tekmira Pharmaceuticals (TKMR) surged over 18% on Wednesday, leaving it up a whopping 180% since mid-July. Investors are betting the Vancouver-based company has a leg up on competitors because last month the FDA gave it a green light to provide its experimental TKM-Ebola drug to test subjects with "confirmed or suspected Ebola virus infections."

Richard Sacra, the American missionary infected with Ebola in Liberia, was given the drug last month before being released from a hospital in Nebraska.

Related: Investors are scared out of their wits

Risky bets: Before jumping into Tekmira and other Ebola-related stocks, investors should realize these investments are still highly speculative and risky.

As CNNMoney has previously reported, guessing which drug maker will be able to come up with an Ebola cure could end up backfiring.

These stocks are likely to continue to experience wild swings on the latest Ebola headlines, especially due to their relatively small market valuations. Tekmira was valued at just $470 million as of Tuesday's close. That pales in comparison with the $171 billion market cap of drug behemoth Merck (MRK).

Tekmira has also warned it has limited supplies of its drug, which is still considered experimental. That means regulators continue to weigh its safety and effectiveness.

Tekmira Ebola outbreak stock

Related: Top 10 companies lobbying Washington

Ebola sparks drug stock rally: A number of other drug makers are also racing to develop Ebola treatments.

Shares of Hemispherx Biopharma (HEB) soared 15% on Wednesday amid the rising Ebola fears. Earlier this week, the company announced a series of research collaborations aimed at developing treatments to fight Ebola.

Another big winner on Wednesday is NewLink Genetics (NLNK), which has the exclusive license to an experimental Ebola vaccine developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada. The FDA recently gave approval for Phase 1 clinical trials on the drug. Shares of NewLink closed 7% higher.

Other drug makers rallying on the Ebola headlines include BioCryst Pharmaceuticals (BCRX), Inovio Pharmaceuticals (INO) and Sarepta Therapeutics (SRPT).

A Sarepta spokesman told CNN that the company has enough product to be able to ship two dozen doses of Ebola treatment in the next few weeks. He also said that it has enough product in the pipeline to create another 100 doses if it gets the funding from the government to do so.

Shares of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) were flat on Wednesday. The British drug maker owns a Swiss vaccine specialist that has an Ebola vaccine currently in preclinical development.

Related: Ebola scare hurts airlines

Even more Ebola impacts: It's not just drug makers moving on the developing Ebola story.

Shares of Lakeland Industries (LAKE) popped almost 30% on Wednesday. The company makes protective clothing, including Hazmat suits.

"$TKMR traders $LAKE has a product to monetize right now," Stocktwits user aaoomomo wrote.

Airline stocks, which have been big winners this year, descended as traders worry about potential travel repercussions. American Airlines (AAL), Delta Air Lines (DAL), JetBlue (JBLU) and Southwest (LUV) all dropped more than 3%. Cruise operators Carnival (CCL) and Royal Caribbean (RCL) also lost ground.

Comment by Contonila Goodman on October 2, 2014 at 5:36pm

So he has made history.

Comment by Ab Gai on October 2, 2014 at 2:56pm
It's happening!!!!
I hate to say I told you so (to America), but I told you this would happen
Comment by Mike k on October 2, 2014 at 1:52pm

This is scary stuff. Now this disease will start getting the focus that it requires.

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