President Obama will visit Flint, Michigan, next week for the first time since the city's water crisis began.

The White House announced the visit in a Medium post, but President Obama personally delivered the news first in a reply letter to 8-year-old Mari Copeny, known as "Little Miss Flint."

Copeny previously wrote that she would be visiting Washington, D.C., along with a group of protesters and hoped she could meet one-on-one with the president.

"I am one of the children that is [affected] by this water, and I’ve been doing my best to march in protest and to speak out for all the kids that live here in Flint," Copeny wrote in her letter. "My mom said chances are you will be too busy with more important things, but there is a lot of people coming on these buses and even just a meeting from you or your wife would really lift people’s spirits."

Obama wrote back, saying, "You're right that Presidents are often busy, but the truth is, in America, there is no more important title than citizen."

"That's why I want you to be the first to know that I'm coming to visit Flint on May 4th," Obama wrote. "Like you, I'll use my voice to call for change and help lift up your community."

Just last week, two state officials and one city official were charged following an investigation of high lead levels in the city's drinking water. A White House official said Obama will "receive an in-person briefing on the federal efforts in place to help respond to the needs of the people."

Obama will also meet with residents and deliver remarks during his visit.

Obama visited Detroit back in January, where he addressed the water crisis saying, "I would be beside myself if my kids’ health could be at risk."

Following a request from Gov. Rick Snyder, Obama declared a national emergency in the city, directing federal funds to assist in relief efforts.

According to Snyder's office, the governor is not currently scheduled to be in Flint, so it is unclear if he will meet with the president on his visit.