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Dominica Has A Vision to Become First Climate-Resilient Nation After Hurricane Devastation

Dominica’s PM is Angry At A Certain Group of People As Hurricane Aid is Distributed {VIDEOAERIAL VIEW OF THE DEVASTATION IN DOMINICA FOLLOWING HURRICANE MARIA LAST MONTH. (PHOTO CREDIT: UN/RICK BAJORNAS)

“Our devastation is so complete that our recovery has to be total. And so we have a unique opportunity to be an example to the world, an example of how an entire nation rebounds from disaster and how an entire nation can be climate resilient for the future.”

Those words from Dominica’s Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit yesterday, at a press conference that followed the United Nations (UN) Secretary-General António Guterres’ visit to the hurricane-torn Eastern Caribbean island yesterday.

Category 5 Hurricane Maria made landfall on September 18, thrashing the country with extreme winds and rain. It left people without electricity and water, destroyed homes and health clinics and isolated communities on the mountainous island.

“We did not choose this opportunity. We did not wish it. Having had it thrust upon us, we have chosen actively and decisively to be that example to the world,” Skerrit said, adding that the UN has an important role in guiding Dominica on its journey to become the world’s first climate-resistant nation, with good analysis on how to achieve and monitor national climate resilience.

During his visit, Guterres took stock of the immense hurricane damage and the relief efforts underway, as well as paying tribute to its leaders for their vision to not only rebuild but to become the world’s first climate-resilient nation.

The UN and its partners recently launched an appeal for US$31.1 million to reach over 90 per cent of Dominicans – some 65,000 people – in the next three months.

“I have never seen anywhere else in the world a forest completely decimated without one single leaf on any tree,” said Guterres, who flew by helicopter over some of the most affected areas. “In every community, most of the buildings are destroyed or heavily damaged.”

SECRETARY-GENERAL ANTÓNIO GUTERRES TOURS DOMINICA IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE DEVASTATION LEFT BEHIND BY HURRICANE MARIA

 

Speaking at a joint press conference with Skerrit in the capital, Roseau, he echoed concerns similar to those expressed the previous day during a visit to Antigua and Barbuda, where he witnessed the destruction caused by Hurricane Irma and met with displaced persons.

He spoke of the need to “make sure the international community fully recognizes that the intensity of hurricanes and multiplication of hurricanes in the Caribbean in this season is not an accident. It is the result of climate change.”

Citing research by the UN World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the Secretary-General said natural disasters had tripled, while the economic damaged caused by them has increased five-fold.

“There is scientific proof that climate change is largely responsible for the dramatic increase in the intensity and devastation caused by the hurricanes in the Caribbean and by many other phenomena around the world,” he said.

In addition to seeing the destruction by air, Guterres, accompanied by the Prime Minister, visited Salybia in the Kalinago territory, where they met with local authorities and members of the community during a distribution of relief aid.

“We thank you for bearing witness today, bearing witness to the future of all humanity if we do not respond to climate change,” stated Prime Minister Skerrit, who just two weeks ago told the UN General Assembly in New York that he had come straight from “the front line of the war on climate change.”

“We thank you for taking the time to walk with us on this battlefield of shattered lives.”

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Dominica Top Cop Says Looters and Crime Under Control in Aftermath of Hurricane Maria PRIME MINISTER ROOSEVELT SKERRIT

People making claims that partisan politics is playing a role in aid distribution to residents of storm-ravaged Dominica today evoked the ire of Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit.

So angry was he at the people he said were seeking to undermine the future of Dominicans, that he repeatedly said he was “pissed off” and just as frequently called on the guilty parties to stop making “unfounded, baseless, malicious allegations” that would only hurt the country.

It was at his daily media briefing that Skerrit lashed out at the culprits.

“This talk about food supplies and partisanship with food supplies and politicians are the ones dealing with the delivery of food supplies – this is total nonsense; total nonsense,” he said, insisting that regional and international agencies were the ones distributing the aid.

“The supplies are coming in; there are structures, there are limitations in terms of places to store the food supplies in communities because every single home got damaged in the country, and people who are seeking to undermine the government’s efforts of bringing relief and bringing aid and bringing restoration of services to our country need to stop it.”

Skerrit acknowledged there were some legitimate complaints and better structures would be put in place to facilitate the more efficient delivery of supplies.

But he said the spreading of misinformation had to end.

“We cannot be going out there on social media, on the radio and elsewhere and making [these] unfounded, baseless, malicious allegations. Don’t think that it’s going to hurt me; it’s not going to hurt me and this thing must stop, because it’s really p****** me off that people out there talking a bunch of nonsense about food supplies and political interference in the delivery of food supplies, which all of these attempts are geared to undermining our efforts. This damn country has been destroyed. It’s been devastated. Schools are destroyed and people are out there talking a bunch of nonsense about food supplies and political interference!”

“The only people who will be affected by this are the people of Dominica and the most vulnerable in our country; the people whose homes are not insured, the people who do not know where they’re sleeping tonight, the people who do not know whether when Monday comes they’ll have a job, who do not know how they’re going to pay their mortgages,” he said.

Skerrit added that his mandate was to ensure the country has adequate supplies to get to every home and individual in the country and he was working to make that happen.

And he was upset that he had been forced to address the allegations when there was a much bigger job at hand.

“I have no time for politics; absolutely no time for partisan politics. My interest and commitment is to do what I can as the Prime Minister of this country to bring hope to the people and to ensure that we can rebuild our country in the soonest possible time,” Skerrit said.

“Dominica needs all of us to focus on rebuilding this country and bringing hope to our people and letting our people know there’ll be a better tomorrow. But we cannot do this when the people are distracted by all these nonsense elements….I have no time to play politics with corned beef or sardines.

“I am really, really pissed off and I have not gotten pissed off since the hurricane but this nonsense must stop, because I shouldn’t have to deal with this foolishness…What the hell, we have to stop it!” the Dominican leader insisted.

He is expected to address the nation tonight at 7 o’clock.

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Dominicans Say Desperation Forcing Them to Loot

The death toll from Hurricane Maria in Dominica has risen to at least 27, with another 27 people confirmed missing, Police Chief Daniel Carbon has disclosed.

He also reported that in the aftermath of the Category 5 hurricane which devastated the Eastern Caribbean island last Monday, looting had been a problem facing lawmen, with one looter being shot by police. That individual was hospitalized as a result.

There was also a prison break on Sunday, in which four people escaped. Two of them were shot and apprehended by police while the others remain on the run.

However, Carbon assured the crime situation was not out of hand and that lawmen had cracked down on offenders.

“The police force was very challenged both as it relates to search and recovery and massive looting but we now have the situation under control,” he said at a press conference yesterday, adding that security personnel from the Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force, the Barbados Defence Force, the Royal Antigua and Barbuda Defence Force, and the Regional Security System have helped get a grip on the situation.

Up to yesterday, 86 people who violated the 4 p.m. to 8 a.m. curfew imposed after the storm’s passage had been arrested, while there were 40 arrests in relation to other matters.

Meantime, in a radio address today, President Charles Savarin condemned the looting taking place in parts of the country, stressing that those culprits were making a difficult situation worse.

He said thieves had prevented the Dominica Water and Sewerage Company Limited from restoring water service to a section of the island on Sunday when they broke into the storeroom and stole 1,000-gallon water tanks, generators, pumps, tools and saws.

“Some of these have been recovered. Those responsible were not seeking food to feed themselves and their families, but were engaged in criminal activities of the worst kind,” Savarin said.

“There are similar activities elsewhere, where business places, containers and warehouses which were not damaged by Hurricane Maria were broken into and looted. I call on all community leaders, the churches, service clubs, NGOs, parliamentary representatives and other Members of Parliament and leaders of trade unions to join me in condemning this criminal behaviour.”

Savarin stressed that this kind of lawlessness only causes more harm and distress to those who have survived and to those who want to help the country

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Dominica at Frontline of a War it Did Not Start, PM Tells UN As He Pleads For Action on Climate ChangeSOME OF THE LOOTERS MAKING THEIR WAY OFF WITH SUPPLIES IN THE CAPITAL, ROSEAU. 

The signs of despair and distress brought on by hunger and thirst are everywhere in the Dominican capital, Roseau, as the very basic instincts of a people still in a trance from the battering they took from Hurricane Maria a week ago, kick in.

There is hardly any drinking water in the land of 365 rivers, not much to eat and hardly anywhere to stay.

As a Barbados TODAY team made our way across the city laid to waste by the category five storm, we encountered grown men who were brought to tears by the very thought of their hellish situation.

A group of men and women could be seen in search of anything they could get their hands on. And when they found something, they took it with a certain degree of remorse.

“We loot because we have no choice,” an upfront Martin Dale said.

“It is all hell. I have been crying for days . . . I have been looting food, I have no choice. It is a hard time . . . man, we don’t have not even water. Help us, please,” he said.

Within eyeshot another man was seen running with what turned out to be disposable nappies.

He had a baby, he said, and he could not help but to help himself to the things he needed to take care of the child, while he continued to search for the remaining members of his family.

“I just need pampers . . . I just need formula for my baby . . . . I don’t have anything . . . . The rest of my family, I can’t find them . . . they probably dead,” he said, while the faint sound of a police siren was heard in the background.

Another man, who identified himself only as Charlie, simply wanted some water, which we gave him from our supply.

He was thankful, claiming that there were people out there seeking to profit from the country’s thirst.

“I have been asking for water from the people and they not giving us. They telling us we have to pay for it. A man on the back of a truck just passed telling us a case cost 40 something dollars or more. We have to loot to take home water, food. ”

Along the Dame Mary Eugenia Charles Boulevard and adjoining streets the picture was one of utter devastation.

A vehicle flipped on its roof, debris, tree trunks and cars strewn across the road told the story of the impact of Hurricane Maria, which is now known to have killed 27 people, with at least an equal number still missing.

In between there were people running with bags, while others simply walked with the few belongings they had left.

“We have a lot of work to do to bring the country back. This is a very [messed up] disaster right now. There have been no supplies or anything being distributed. It is madness,” one woman shouted as we made our way to the site of the Visitor Information Bureau and Craft Centre.

The many stalls that were once part of the thriving business area where tourist coming off cruise ships at the Roseau cruise ship berth bargained for souvenirs, were left in shambles.

Over at the well-known Fort Young Hotel, Florida native Jim Wyss said Maria was unlike anything he had ever experienced.

Wyss had left the US to escape Hurricane Irma, which was headed to the American mainland after inflicting its own destruction on the Caribbean, only to be confronted by Maria in Dominica.

Another hotel guest was Barbadian economist Jeremy Stephen, who was scheduled to speak at a seminar there, but was instead trapped in Roseau after regional carrier LIAT cancelled flights out of the country ahead of the storm.

“When the rain and the winds came, it was terrible. The roof on the floor above me went so my room flooded, so it was a choice I had to make – stay in the room or drown. I couldn’t get out . . . but the maintenance guys came. I don’t know how they knew I was there . . . they must have seen the light from my phone but they came and rescued me. Thank God for them.

“They took me and some others to the VIP room which was said to be sturdy but with the rain and wind that was happening, that crashed down on us as well. So, we had to leave there. It was like if you were one of the characters in the Call of Duty video game. You had to be dodging and slipping out at strategic time,” Stephen recounted.

A traumatized Stephen recalled the looting – of the goods the looters would probably never get to use and, later, of the bare necessities of life.

“As I stand here today . . . people are now resorting to finding water. It is very scarce here in Dominica. People are hungry. Many of them don’t have a roof above their heads. Everybody in Dominica has been impacted by this thing. Everybody,” a sullen Stephen said. 


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Dominica Prime Minister Moved to Tears as he Tells of His Hurricane-Hit Island’s Plight {VIDEO} THE DESTRUCTION CAUSED BY HURRICANE MARIA HAS LEFT DOMINICA LIKE A WAR ZONE

Pleading with all members of the United Nations General Assembly – large and small, rich and poor – to come together to save the planet, the Prime Minister of Dominica, where the landscape, ravaged by back-to-back hurricanes “resembles a war zone” on the heels of Hurricane Maria last week, said his and other islands in the Caribbean need help now to fight a war that is not of their own creation.

Just two years after tropical storm Erika had ripped through the region, leaving death and destruction in his country, Roosevelt Skerrit said Dominica and others in the region had been ravaged by perhaps the worst hurricane season on record, with Irma and Maria leaving loss of lives and livelihoods, and as yet untold damage.

PRIME MINISTER ROOSEVELT SKERRIT OF DOMINICA ADDRESSES THE GENERAL DEBATE OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY’S SEVENTY-SECOND SESSION

“I come to you straight from the front line of the war on climate change,” he said in an emotional address to the General Assembly’s annual general debate on Saturday when he reported on “desolation beyond imagination” in his storm-battered country where at least 15 have died and countless others are missing, homes have been flattened, buildings left roofless, water pipes smashed, road infrastructure destroyed, crops uprooted, the hospital left without power, schools disappeared beneath the rubble, and “where there was green, there is now only dust and dirt”.


THE MORNING AFTER HURRICANE MARIA

“To deny climate change is to procrastinate while the earth sinks; it is to deny a truth we have just lived! It is to mock thousands of my compatriots who…without a roof over their heads, will watch the night descend on Dominica in fear of sudden mud slides and what the next hurricane may bring.

“We as a country and as a region did not start this war against nature! We did not provoke it! The war has come to us!”

Skerrit said warmer air and sea temperatures have permanently altered the climate between the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn. He noted that heat is the fuel that takes ordinary storms – “storms we could normally master in our sleep – and supercharges them into a devastating force”.

The most unfortunate reality, he said, is that there is little time left to reverse damages and rectify this trajectory.

“We need action and we need it now,” he said. “While the big countries talk, the small island nations suffer…We in the Caribbean do not produce greenhouse gases or sulphate aerosols. We do not pollute or overfish our oceans. We have made no contribution to global warming that can move the needle. But yet, we are among the main victims on the frontline.”

“The nation of Dominica has come to declare an international humanitarian emergency – one that is centred in Dominica but also encompasses many of our neighbours including our sister isle, Antigua, which had to evacuate its citizens from Barbuda,” he said, referring to the declaration of Barbuda as uninhabitable following the battering by Hurricane Irma earlier this month.

Identifying his Eastern Caribbean nation’s specific needs on the heels of Maria’s destruction, Skerrit said water, food and emergency shelter are priority but the island also needs roads, bridges and new infrastructure, as well as capabilities of delivery.

He therefore called on those nations with substantial military capacities “to lend us the rescue and rebuilding equipment that may be standing idle waiting for a war”.

“Let Dominica today be that war, because currently our landscape reflects a zone of war. The battle we face has brought us to our knees. We need resources now, so that we may move with purpose to the task of rebuilding our beautiful island home. We will need to rebuild homes and villages. We will need to rebuild communities, schools, roads and bridges. We will need to rebuild a country, and we cannot do it alone.”

The Dominican leader said the time has come for the international community to make a stand and to decide whether it will be shoulder to shoulder with those suffering the ravages of climate change worldwide.

“…Whether we can mitigate the consequences of unprecedented increases in sea temperatures and levels; whether to help us rebuild sustainable livelihoods; or whether the international community will merely show some pity now, and then flee, relieved to know that this time it was not you. We, the small nations of the world, need to know who our real friends are, who have our backs.”

In an equally impassioned address, The Bahamas’ Minister of Foreign Affairs Darren Henfield expressed his concern about the effects of environmental degradation and climate change which are threatening the survivability of small island developing states.

“With what we have witnessed just recently with the passage of hurricanes Harvey, Irma and now Maria, I cannot underscore sufficiently the importance the Bahamas attaches to combating climate change, and the preservation and protection of the environment,” he said.

Stressing that “climate change is global,” he emphasized the damage that hurricane Irma had in the Bahamian archipelago. While the Bahamas had not suffered a direct hit, the southern islands experienced serious damage. Additionally, tornadoes inflicted considerable damage on the northern islands of Bimini and Grand Bahama.

The Minister spoke about the administration’s intention to create the first fully green island in the region, out of the destruction of Ragged Island which became uninhabitable.

“For the first time in its history, The Bahamas evacuated whole communities to safe quadrants ahead of Hurricane Irma. What’s next: wholesale evacuation of the entire Caribbean?” he asked, calling on the international community to act fast, and in a coordinated way.

Henfield also highlighted the “need to re-evaluate the measurements used to determine economic well-being” in the country, to allow them to receive development assistant.

THE DESTRUCTION CAUSED BY HURRICANE MARIA HAS LEFT DOMINICA LIKE A WAR ZONE.

Pleading with all members of the United Nations General Assembly – large and small, rich and poor – to come together to save the planet, the Prime Minister of Dominica, where the landscape, ravaged by back-to-back hurricanes “resembles a war zone” on the heels of Hurricane Maria last week, said his and other islands in the Caribbean need help now to fight a war that is not of their own creation.

Just two years after tropical storm Erika had ripped through the region, leaving death and destruction in his country, Roosevelt Skerrit said Dominica and others in the region had been ravaged by perhaps the worst hurricane season on record, with Irma and Maria leaving loss of lives and livelihoods, and as yet untold damage.

PRIME MINISTER ROOSEVELT SKERRIT OF DOMINICA ADDRESSES THE GENERAL DEBATE OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY’S SEVENTY-SECOND SESSION

“I come to you straight from the front line of the war on climate change,” he said in an emotional address to the General Assembly’s annual general debate on Saturday when he reported on “desolation beyond imagination” in his storm-battered country where at least 15 have died and countless others are missing, homes have been flattened, buildings left roofless, water pipes smashed, road infrastructure destroyed, crops uprooted, the hospital left without power, schools disappeared beneath the rubble, and “where there was green, there is now only dust and dirt”.

THE MORNING AFTER HURRICANE MARIA. 

“To deny climate change is to procrastinate while the earth sinks; it is to deny a truth we have just lived! It is to mock thousands of my compatriots who…without a roof over their heads, will watch the night descend on Dominica in fear of sudden mud slides and what the next hurricane may bring.

“We as a country and as a region did not start this war against nature! We did not provoke it! The war has come to us!”

Skerrit said warmer air and sea temperatures have permanently altered the climate between the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn. He noted that heat is the fuel that takes ordinary storms – “storms we could normally master in our sleep – and supercharges them into a devastating force”.

The most unfortunate reality, he said, is that there is little time left to reverse damages and rectify this trajectory.

“We need action and we need it now,” he said. “While the big countries talk, the small island nations suffer…We in the Caribbean do not produce greenhouse gases or sulphate aerosols. We do not pollute or overfish our oceans. We have made no contribution to global warming that can move the needle. But yet, we are among the main victims on the frontline.”

“The nation of Dominica has come to declare an international humanitarian emergency – one that is centred in Dominica but also encompasses many of our neighbours including our sister isle, Antigua, which had to evacuate its citizens from Barbuda,” he said, referring to the declaration of Barbuda as uninhabitable following the battering by Hurricane Irma earlier this month.

Identifying his Eastern Caribbean nation’s specific needs on the heels of Maria’s destruction, Skerrit said water, food and emergency shelter are priority but the island also needs roads, bridges and new infrastructure, as well as capabilities of delivery.

He therefore called on those nations with substantial military capacities “to lend us the rescue and rebuilding equipment that may be standing idle waiting for a war”.

“Let Dominica today be that war, because currently our landscape reflects a zone of war. The battle we face has brought us to our knees. We need resources now, so that we may move with purpose to the task of rebuilding our beautiful island home. We will need to rebuild homes and villages. We will need to rebuild communities, schools, roads and bridges. We will need to rebuild a country, and we cannot do it alone.”

The Dominican leader said the time has come for the international community to make a stand and to decide whether it will be shoulder to shoulder with those suffering the ravages of climate change worldwide.

“…Whether we can mitigate the consequences of unprecedented increases in sea temperatures and levels; whether to help us rebuild sustainable livelihoods; or whether the international community will merely show some pity now, and then flee, relieved to know that this time it was not you. We, the small nations of the world, need to know who our real friends are, who have our backs.”

In an equally impassioned address, The Bahamas’ Minister of Foreign Affairs Darren Henfield expressed his concern about the effects of environmental degradation and climate change which are threatening the survivability of small island developing states.

“With what we have witnessed just recently with the passage of hurricanes Harvey, Irma and now Maria, I cannot underscore sufficiently the importance the Bahamas attaches to combating climate change, and the preservation and protection of the environment,” he said.

Stressing that “climate change is global,” he emphasized the damage that hurricane Irma had in the Bahamian archipelago. While the Bahamas had not suffered a direct hit, the southern islands experienced serious damage. Additionally, tornadoes inflicted considerable damage on the northern islands of Bimini and Grand Bahama.

The Minister spoke about the administration’s intention to create the first fully green island in the region, out of the destruction of Ragged Island which became uninhabitable.

“For the first time in its history, The Bahamas evacuated whole communities to safe quadrants ahead of Hurricane Irma. What’s next: wholesale evacuation of the entire Caribbean?” he asked, calling on the international community to act fast, and in a coordinated way.

Henfield also highlighted the “need to re-evaluate the measurements used to determine economic well-being” in the country, to allow them to receive development assistant.


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Houses ripped to shreds, power lines toppled, and cars smashed into the road: How Hurricane Maria left Dominica looking like an apocalyptic wasteland

Unable to hold back tears, Dominica’s Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit today spoke directly to the public for the first time since Hurricane Maria left his island in shambles.

And he says the Eastern Caribbean island that got a direct hit from the Category 5 hurricane on Monday night needs help now more than ever.

An emotional Skerrit this afternoon appeared on ABS TV in Antigua, where he arrived by helicopter after two days of surveying the damage done in his island which is home to 72,000 people.

He said the entire country had been impacted by the hurricane which brought 160 mile-per-hour winds and heavy rains.

“Every part of the country….everywhere in Dominica has received a serious beating , every part. If it was not by the wind, it was by river coming into your homes and siltation submerging your homes,” he said as he wiped away tears. “It is a miracle that there were not hundreds of deaths.”

The death toll is now at least 15, but many others are missing, Skerrit said.

The Prime Minister, who also lost his roof during the storm, became teary as he talked about the most immediate needs – tarpaulins, water, and food supplies.

“Every village I’ve been to, they are in need of water and more water and baby supplies,” he said.
Communication systems are still down, but there is currently limited cell phone service. The hospital lost its roof and Skerrit said the dialysis machines there are down, the Intensive Care Unit was destroyed, and there is a need for assistance airlifting patients to Martinique.

“One patient who has to receive dialysis everyday walked over 21 miles and I met him at the hospital…Another patient, if he doesn’t get airlifted, he will expire,” he said.

Skerrit acknowledged that it would be a long and difficult road to recovery. But he said he believes Dominicans can pull through.

“I am confident that if we remain united as a people we can bounce back. It will take us some time, but as for myself, I am completely committed to the country in doing what I can to assist in raising the necessary finances and making contacts,” he said.

The Prime Minister will use a trip to the United Nations General Assembly in New York to seek help for his country.

He said while he had no previous intentions of going, he has had a change of heart, and will go on Friday to “speak to the international community, to have meetings with UN Secretary General, to outline Dominica’s situation”.

“Unfortunately, we had to wait for Irma and Maria to let the world understand what we’ve been saying to them for a long time – that we are very vulnerable. We are exposed to the ravages of climate change. We need access to resources to build more resilient societies and countries. We have been playing our part but the extent of the resources required to put in the mitigation systems is beyond us,” he said.

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Death and Destruction Emerge From Dominica Other pictures from Dominica show the island has been clogged with debris including branches and trees which have been stripped of their bark by the extremely strong winds

  • Devastation on island of Dominica laid bare after it was ripped apart by 160mph winds from Hurricane Maria 
  • Trees have been stripped bare, houses torn to pieces, and cars smashed into the road by the powerful storm
  • Aerial views show barely an inch of the island, which has a population of 73,000, has escaped unscathed
  • Hurricane Maria is still swirling in the Atlantic having struck Puerto Rico, leaving it without any power

The post-apocalyptic destruction on Dominica has been laid bare in an exclusive set of pictures after the island was ravaged by Hurricane Maria.

Houses have been torn to pieces, trees stripped bare and a car slammed into a road by falling debris after 160mph winds ripped through the Caribbean paradise to pieces and turned it into a nightmare.

In photographs taken on the ground, bewildered Dominicans can be seen wandering amid the wreckage of their homes. Buildings are completely destroyed, while a plume of black smoke curls into the air on the horizon.

Exclusive pictures reveal the post-apocalyptic devastation of the Caribbean island of Dominica which was torn to pieces by Hurricane Maria as it struck with 160mph winds earlier this week

Exclusive pictures reveal the post-apocalyptic devastation of the Caribbean island of Dominica which was torn to pieces by Hurricane Maria as it struck with 160mph winds earlier this week

Aerial surveys show that around 95 per cent of the houses on the island have been left without a roof, as corrugated iron and wood litters the streets having been blown around by the storm

Aerial surveys show that around 95 per cent of the houses on the island have been left without a roof, as corrugated iron and wood litters the streets having been blown around by the storm

The island, one of the poorest in the Caribbean, is struggling to recover from the effects of the hurricane, with Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit saying they have 'lost all that money can buy'

The island, one of the poorest in the Caribbean, is struggling to recover from the effects of the hurricane, with Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit saying they have 'lost all that money can buy'

 A set of aerial photographs further illustrates the scale of the devastation suffered by the island, which has been under total communications blackout since the storm. 

The pictures show row upon row of ruined houses with debris strewn all around. Entire forests have been stripped bare by the winds, and not a dwelling appears unscathed. 

Although Dominica has a population of 73,000 people, the phone lines, internet and electricity are down, meaning that almost no news or pictures have emerged from the country since Maria struck.

Dominica is known as the 'Island of 365 rivers' on account of its numerous bodies of water that flow down the mountainous terrain of the island. 

This, however, has left the territory prone to mudslides which have contributed to the mounting death toll. At least seven people have been confirmed killed by the hurricane, and that number is expected to rise dramatically. 

Hartley Henry, an adviser to the prime minister, Roosevelt Skerrit, said there had been a 'tremendous loss of housing and public buildings'. 

Henry said that he had spoken to Skerrit – whose residence was destroyed by the hurricane, forcing his rescue – on a satellite phone. 'He and family are fine. Dominica is not,' he said.

'The main general hospital took a beating. Patient care has been compromised. Many buildings serving as shelters lost roofs, which means that a very urgent need now is tarpaulins and other roofing materials.

Plane footage shows Dominica after it was hit by a hurricane
Aerial images show that barely an inch of the island has avoided the damage, with trees stripped bare and houses torn to pieces by the strength of the winds

Aerial images show that barely an inch of the island has avoided the damage, with trees stripped bare and houses torn to pieces by the strength of the winds

 Dominica is known as the Island of Rivers thanks to the tributaries which run down its slopes. However, these make the territory particularly vulnerable to landslides, which contributed to the storm damage

 Dominica is known as the Island of Rivers thanks to the tributaries which run down its slopes. However, these make the territory particularly vulnerable to landslides, which contributed to the storm damage

At least seven people have been reported killed in the storm, with that number expected to rise rapidly as government officials are able to fully explore the island

At least seven people have been reported killed in the storm, with that number expected to rise rapidly as government officials are able to fully explore the island

'It’s difficult to determine the level of fatalities, but so far seven are confirmed as a direct result of the hurricane. That figure, the prime minister fears, will rise as he wades his way into the rural communities.' 

A Canadian citizen stuck on the island said: 'We have no idea what's happening. We've been going to immigration. We chase every helicopter that lands!... We've been hiding in our house because people say at night people will try to rob houses.' 

The woman added: 'We have to loot stores for food and water... We've had to hide our stuff around our house. No power or water. It's getting dangerous at this point.' 

She added: 'People walk around with machete knives, it's crazy.'

Dominica was among the Caribbean Islands worst affected by the hurricanes, destroying the house of prime minister Roosevelt Skerrit, who had to be rescued. 

The 44-year-old, who has led the country since 2004, said he had been at the 'complete mercy of the hurricane'  which he described as 'rough, rough, rough' before making it to safety.

He later warned the island of 72,000 people has lost 'all that money can buy', adding on Facebook: 'My greatest fear for the morning is that we will wake to news of serious physical injury and possible deaths as a result of likely landslides triggered by persistent rains.'

Video shows horrifying wreckage of crash on Dominica
Other pictures from Dominica show the island has been clogged with debris including branches and trees which have been stripped of their bark by the extremely strong winds

Other pictures from Dominica show the island has been clogged with debris including branches and trees which have been stripped of their bark by the extremely strong winds

With no power on the island and emergency services over-burdened by the disaster, people fear that looters will soon try to take advantage of the situation by raiding houses at night

With no power on the island and emergency services over-burdened by the disaster, people fear that looters will soon try to take advantage of the situation by raiding houses at night

After devastating Dominica, Hurricane Maria moved on to Puerto Rico where it completely destroyed the country's power grid, leaving 3.3million people without electricity

After devastating Dominica, Hurricane Maria moved on to Puerto Rico where it completely destroyed the country's power grid, leaving 3.3million people without electricity

Virtually no structure on Dominica escaped the storm's wrath, hampering repair efforts. This gas station has been left as little more than a ruin by the force of the hurricane

Virtually no structure on Dominica escaped the storm's wrath, hampering repair efforts. This gas station has been left as little more than a ruin by the force of the hurricane

Photos from elsewhere on the island show gas stations have been destroyed, hampering repair efforts as machines that could have helped lie idle or damaged.

Elsewhere the streets are littered with branches torn from trees that have been stripped of their bark by the sheer force of the storm.

Trees lie scattered around having been torn out of the ground, mirroring the power lines that have been toppled into the streets, cutting electricity from thousands of homes.

On the nearby island of Puerto Rico, Maria left the entire island without power, as officials warned that it could be out for months while they try to repair the damage.

The true extent of the devastation is still not known as the government has not been able to conduct a fly-over of the island to assess the scale of the damage.

While Maria had dropped to a Category 2 storm after becoming the strongest hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in 100 years, it strengthened to a Category 3 on Wednesday as it neared the Dominican Republic.

Maria was expected to pick up strength as it churns toward the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas later on Thursday. Storm surges on the islands could be as high as 12 feet

Maria would then move north in the Atlantic Ocean over the weekend and there was no indication as to whether it would hit the continental United States. 

How Hurricane Maria left Dominica looking like a wasteland++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

SOME OF THE DAMAGE DONE IN DOMINICA. (PHOTO CREDIT: ABS TELEVISION/RADIO)

Seven people have so far been confirmed dead as a result of Hurricane Maria’s direct hit on Dominica on Monday night. But there are fears that death toll could rise as officials get into communities that have not yet been reached.

Much of the island’s housing stock were either damaged or destroyed by Maria’s 160 mile-per-hour winds, according to Hartley Henry, principal advisor to Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit.

“The country is in a daze – no electricity, no running water as a result of uprooted pipes in most communities and definitely [no] landline or cellphone services on island, and that will be for quite a while,” Henry wrote in a message after speaking to Prime Minister Skerrit this morning via satellite phone.

“In summary, the island has been devastated. The housing stock significantly damaged or destroyed. All available public buildings are being used as shelters, with very limited roofing materials evident. The country needs the support and continued help and prayers of all.”

The first aerial footage from the island, put together from a Regional Security System (RSS) aerial reconnaissance flight, shows flattened buildings, fallen trees and strewn debris from the Category 5 hurricane.

Henry’s message, shared on the Dominica Hurricane Maria Disaster Relief Facebook page, gave some idea of the extent of the devastation that is slowly coming to light.

“The main general hospital took a beating. Patient care has been compromised. Many buildings serving as shelters lost roofs, which means that a very urgent need now is tarpaulins and other roofing materials. Little contact has been made with the outer communities, but persons who walked 10 and 15 miles towards the city of Roseau from various outer districts report total destruction of homes, some roadways and crops.

“Urgent helicopter services are needed to take food, water and tarpaulins to outer districts for shelter. Canefield airport can accommodate helicopter landings and it is expected that from today, the waters around the main Roseau port will be calm enough to accommodate vessels bringing relief supplies and other forms of assistance.

“It’s difficult to determine the level of fatalities but so far seven are confirmed, as a direct result of the hurricane. That figure, the Prime Minister fears, will rise as he wades his way into the rural communities today, Wednesday. The urgent needs now are roofing materials for shelters, bedding supplies for hundreds stranded in or outside what’s left of their homes and food and water drops for residents of outlying districts inaccessible at the moment,” Henry said.

He added that the tarmac at the Douglas–Charles Airport, formerly known as Melville Hall Airport, was not too badly damaged and the strip should be opened in a day or two for larger relief planes to land.


The Barbados-based Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) yesterday prepared a shipment of 250 family packages of relief supplies, including water and non-perishable food items, which were transported last night to Dominica by the Barbados Coast Guard.

Several Caribbean leaders have pledged aid for Dominica, including Antigua and Barbuda’s Prime Minister Gaston Browne, despite his own government’s challenge of rebuilding of Barbuda which was left uninhabitable by another Category 5 hurricane, Irma, two weeks ago.

While there is still no total picture of the damage caused by Maria, CDEMA Executive Director Ronald Jackson said that based on historical knowledge of Dominica and the fact that the eye of hurricane swept across the island from southeast to northwest, there would be “billions of dollars” in damage, with virtually every one of the estimated 70,000 residents directly or indirectly impacted.

“Anyone [who] understands the geography of Dominica and the complexity or settlement in Dominica, what you are looking at is a potential for significant, significant damage to housing and infrastructure in an island that was already reeling [from the] 2013 December flood rains, 2015 impact of Tropical Storm Erika and several localized flood incidents which would have removed bridges which would have been put in place post-Erika,” he said at a press conference.

Jackson said CDEMA had identified a number of coastal and internal communities around the island which were of particular concern, including the Kalinago community in the east of the island where the indigenous people live, because of the poor quality of housing there, as well as “quite a number of communities along the east as well as on the north which are going to be affected by both the storm surge as well as flooding conditions”.

He was also concerned about the capital, Roseau, where reports emerged that the Roseau River had overflowed its banks.

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Comment by caribmama on October 14, 2017 at 8:09pm

I bet all the Caribbean islands will have their islands up and running faster than Puerto Rico.

Comment by mr1stroke on October 1, 2017 at 5:03pm

Ricardo O'Connor  keep the love and unity

Comment by mr1stroke on October 1, 2017 at 2:31am
El-Bull look at the sad state they have never been any upgrade on this site, look at the time you have been commenting to now, its 2017 what is different on this site? The simplest thing to edit comment still cant be done, the only reason why this site still exist its because the few of us still comments and have to contribute to it, you realize i dont even bother post any blogs, if this site would sell they would not get no money for it because the traffic is not that large, but it proves how behind and lazy ngros are, thats why black people dont own anything they are too lazy to compete and put in hard work, they are satisfy with negro pennies, this site been here before snapchat, but look at snap chat now, if the niggers who own this site stood for success this would be the caibbeans facebook, even with the radio show they cannot grow any more traffic let me be their consultant if they are willing to invest i guaranty you in one year ill turn this s*** to facebook biggest challenge, if you pay attention facebook is the new myspace, only the idiots are on there, i dont even remember my password, i promote my business through instagram and do snap event, so dont hold your breath
Comment by El-Bull on September 30, 2017 at 9:59pm

I JUST WONDERING WHY IT TAKES SO LONG FOR COMMENTS TO SHOW AND NOW WE CAN'T POST ON THE SITE 

Comment by Ricardo O'Connor on September 30, 2017 at 7:30pm
Mr1Stroke, no worries.

Hsman, This is for you. Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you. Matthew 7:6
Comment by HandsomeMan on September 30, 2017 at 6:55am
Dude is gangsta. That should shut the naysers up. People who yap alot gets nothing done
Comment by HandsomeMan on September 27, 2017 at 9:00pm
Wtf with these dumb ass bible thumpers running theie mouths but never donate. Between stroklyn and coonnne
Comment by HandsomeMan on September 27, 2017 at 8:55pm
People loot to eat.
Comment by mr1stroke on September 27, 2017 at 6:37pm
Ricardo O'Connor yes thanks, nice break down, just wanted to be sure i was on the right lane and also that i did not miss understand your position
Comment by Caribbean Fever on September 27, 2017 at 6:18pm
Comment by mr1stroke 48 minutes ago 
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and i say to all who keep saying pray for the people, i have a better idea, sell everything you got, and give away everything you have to the people, than pray for your self so you can get everything back, since you believe everything must be done with prayer, you damn idiots, prayer is a tool to give you srenght and guidance to complete your mission, God never said sit your ass down and everything will happen for you, if thats the case why do all of you who goes to church and believe in God to work, some of you even skip church on sundays to go to work, wait i guess you dont believe in prayer that much, and how come when peter was fishing, Jesus prayed and tell him to try again, how come when the people did not have enough bread and fish to feed every one Jesus prayed and multiply the food in order to have enough, how come Jesus had to have water to make wine, you damn idiots stop reading your bible upside down and help those people, you are so proud to be caribbean, you people brag about how successful you are but cant open your wallet, I always said those who comes on here to brag are a bunch of fraud, you are lonely and so not important so you have to brag about the life you wish in order to feel important online but you dont ask your self, why should we care or believe you, now how about you post the receipt of your donation, if where you donate is legit like red cross you will get a receipt for tax purposes, damn smart idiots

Comment by mr1stroke 55 minutes ago 
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Dave yes, many people dont understand that, no real man will stand around and watch their kids and love ones, starve to death, no real mothers will watch their kids go hungry, and those are the people i stand with no matter what they do, sometimes we have to make the wrong decisions to make things right, but those who scared and stand like a coward will make excuses why they cant, the first thing they will say pray for the people lol damn idiots

Comment by Dave 1 hour ago 
Delete Comment
A hungry family makes a man dangerous.
Comment by Konrad 1 hour ago 
Delete Comment
Water is and will always be our number one priority...clean drinking water to be more specific.
Comment by mr1stroke 2 hours ago 
Delete Comment
The Bible tell you all of that, if you understand what you read realize many passages in the Bible are prediction and warning of the unfortunate events that will take place, in Somalia people getting kill over water, because its hard to dig a well due to dry land and this is just a beginning

 

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